Citation

Management, Drop Your Tools: Military Metaphors for Wildland Firefighting and Public Resistance to “Safety” Legacies of Tragedy Fires

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

This paper explores recent public resistance to the Forest Service’s proffered “safety” legacies of tragedy fires. A rhetorical organizational communication analysis shows how a root military metaphor for firefighting has historically constrained the agency’s public sensemaking about tragedy fires. Because safety is constructed as rule following, tragedies are framed as failure in discipline, solutions involve tightening the iron cage of control, and fallen firefighters are eulogized with promises for future organizational perfection. But repeated accidents only raise questions about past promises, and most recently seem to call into question the organization’s rhetorical competence. The paper analyzes the discursive elements that help to sustain the organization’s root military metaphor, and identifies alternate metaphors for wildland firefighting safety that might help the Forest Service to redeem its discursive competence. Implications for rhetorical tools like root metaphor analysis, lists and stories, and the enthymeme, are discussed.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

fire (234), firefight (138), safeti (113), forest (107), servic (103), rule (77), report (72), investig (70), metaphor (58), king (58), storm (58), mountain (53), manag (50), thirtymil (49), tragedi (46), order (45), militari (42), studi (41), accid (38), cultur (37), list (37),

Author's Keywords:

root metaphors for organizing, enthymeme, U.S. Forest Service, crisis communication, lists and stories, Aristotle
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111824_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Thackaberry, Jennifer. "Management, Drop Your Tools: Military Metaphors for Wildland Firefighting and Public Resistance to “Safety” Legacies of Tragedy Fires" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111824_index.html>

APA Citation:

Thackaberry, J. A. , 2003-05-27 "Management, Drop Your Tools: Military Metaphors for Wildland Firefighting and Public Resistance to “Safety” Legacies of Tragedy Fires" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111824_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores recent public resistance to the Forest Service’s proffered “safety” legacies of tragedy fires. A rhetorical organizational communication analysis shows how a root military metaphor for firefighting has historically constrained the agency’s public sensemaking about tragedy fires. Because safety is constructed as rule following, tragedies are framed as failure in discipline, solutions involve tightening the iron cage of control, and fallen firefighters are eulogized with promises for future organizational perfection. But repeated accidents only raise questions about past promises, and most recently seem to call into question the organization’s rhetorical competence. The paper analyzes the discursive elements that help to sustain the organization’s root military metaphor, and identifies alternate metaphors for wildland firefighting safety that might help the Forest Service to redeem its discursive competence. Implications for rhetorical tools like root metaphor analysis, lists and stories, and the enthymeme, are discussed.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 35
Word count: 11860
Text sample:
1 Management Drop Your Tools: Military Metaphors for Wildland Firefighting and Public Resistance to “Safety” Legacies of Tragedy Fires “Drop your tools” is advice given to wildland firefighters for the moment when a fire rages out of control and they must retreat to save their own lives (Dolan 1996). This advice stems from recent analyses of the legendary Mann Gulch fire that killed thirteen elite Smokejumpers in 1949 near Helena MT (MacLean 1992; Weick 1993) and the Storm King
with weather and local factors influencing fire behavior. 5. Uninformed on strategy tactics and hazards. 6. Instructions and assignments not clear. 7. No communication link with crewmembers/supervisors. 8. Constructing line without safe anchor point. 9. Building fireline downhill with fire below. 10. Attempting frontal assault on fire. 11. Unburned fuel between you and the fire. 12. Cannot see main fire not in contact with anyone who can. 13. On a hillside where rolling material can ignite fuel below. 14.


Similar Titles:
Organizational Shooting Stars and Bureaucratic Superstars: Comparing Ecosystem Management Implementation in the Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service

FOREST TREE AND FERN SPECIES AS INDICATORS OF AN UNNATURAL FIRE EVENT IN MULANJE MOUNTAIN FOREST RESERVE, MALAWI

Military Culture, the Rule of Law, and U.S. Foreign Policy: The Role of the US Military in American Opposition to the International Criminal Court


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.