All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Ranch State and CitizenSpace: Digital Democracy and Web Strategies for the United States and the United Kingdom
Unformatted Document Text:  15 of the future… working out debates as to the future organizational mission… shaping the discourse economy of the organization.” Lemke argues that websites can represent the outcome of organizational debates over the mission of an organization, because they serve as a publicly observable discursive statement (Lemke, 1999). On the other side of the Atlantic, the FCO raced ahead of other reformers in the ICT infrastructure of the UK with its own “visible” discourse about the mission of the FCO and its relationship to the public. While the State Department raced to narrow the “performance gap” it experienced with other federal agencies – the FCO site was winning accolades from the government from 1998 to 2001. For two years (2000-2001), the FCO website was recognized with the “Profile Award for Best Government Website” – based primarily on “meeting customer needs, interactivity, and accessibility” (FCO Press Release, 2001). The FCO website, while sticking to the national context of emphasis on the delivery of public services through technology described by Hagen (2000) and Taylor and Bellamy (1998) – went beyond the consumer-oriented service delivery approach. The Profile Award recognized attempts to not only facilitate more streamlined access to information and relevant forms, but also by engaging public audiences through online discussion forums. The Public Forum, introduced in 2000, “gives users the chance to have their say on foreign policy.” (FCO Press Release, March 21, 2001). In addition, the FCO utilized “push” technology to allow for customization of website content and e-mail alert notification of FCO information. According to the FCO statement, over 23,000 users have registered for personalized access to the FCO website. Website Analysis Given what we know about the contextual and historical factors leading to the current state of digital democracy in foreign policy – what is articulated in the current website presence? To assess the web presence strategies for both the United States and United Kingdom foreign service sites and their digital democracy capacities – the sites were evaluated given three of the

Authors: Hayden, Craig.
first   previous   Page 15 of 27   next   last



background image
15
of the future… working out debates as to the future organizational mission… shaping the
discourse economy of the organization.” Lemke argues that websites can represent the outcome
of organizational debates over the mission of an organization, because they serve as a publicly
observable discursive statement (Lemke, 1999).
On the other side of the Atlantic, the FCO raced ahead of other reformers in the ICT
infrastructure of the UK with its own “visible” discourse about the mission of the FCO and its
relationship to the public. While the State Department raced to narrow the “performance gap” it
experienced with other federal agencies – the FCO site was winning accolades from the
government from 1998 to 2001. For two years (2000-2001), the FCO website was recognized
with the “Profile Award for Best Government Website” – based primarily on “meeting customer
needs, interactivity, and accessibility” (FCO Press Release, 2001).
The FCO website, while sticking to the national context of emphasis on the delivery of
public services through technology described by Hagen (2000) and Taylor and Bellamy (1998) –
went beyond the consumer-oriented service delivery approach. The Profile Award recognized
attempts to not only facilitate more streamlined access to information and relevant forms, but also
by engaging public audiences through online discussion forums. The Public Forum, introduced in
2000, “gives users the chance to have their say on foreign policy.” (FCO Press Release, March
21, 2001). In addition, the FCO utilized “push” technology to allow for customization of website
content and e-mail alert notification of FCO information. According to the FCO statement, over
23,000 users have registered for personalized access to the FCO website.
Website Analysis
Given what we know about the contextual and historical factors leading to the current
state of digital democracy in foreign policy – what is articulated in the current website presence?
To assess the web presence strategies for both the United States and United Kingdom foreign
service sites and their digital democracy capacities – the sites were evaluated given three of the


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 15 of 27   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.