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Voter Cynicism, Perception of Media Negativism and Voting Behavior in Taiwan's 2001 Election
Unformatted Document Text:  11 These percentages far exceeded the actual voting turnout in 2000 and 2001. One explanation may be due to the failure to include in the measurement those respondents who did not finish answering the questionnaire containing all the questions related to campaign issues. Most of the respondents (85.7%) disagreed that there is no difference whether one votes or not. About half (51.8%) agreed that “voting is the only way that people like me can have any say about government running things.” More than ninety percent (92.5%) of the respondents disagreed with the statement that “most of the time we can trust our government to do what is right.” This result far exceeded what the author found in the election of 2000. The same question asked of Taiwan voters that year resulted in seventy two percent of the respondents disagreeing. Moreover, more than half (54.7%) agreed “the government does not care about what people like me think except during the election period.” Demographics and Media Use The results (Table 2a) indicate that gender and party identification significantly predict voter terrestrial television election news attention. Age, education, and party identification significantly predict voter exposure to the newspapers’ election coverage. Age and party identification significantly predict voter attention to newspaper campaign coverage as well. The results (Table 2b) show that party identification is the only variable significantly predicting voters’ exposure and attention to cable television election coverage. Those that are older, and with a party identification, are likely watch more call-in television programs. Demographics were not a good predictor of voter radio call-in behavior. Younger and higher educated voters will use the Internet more often to access election related news. Age is the only demographic variable that significantly predicts voters’ perceptions of negativism of television election coverage (Table 3). The older the voters, the more negative comments they had toward television’s election coverage. Regression Analysis The hierarchical multiple regressions were used to analyze the relationships between independent variables and the dependent variable: cynicism, voting, and satisfaction

Authors: Peng, Wein (Bonnie).
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11
These percentages far exceeded the actual voting turnout in 2000 and 2001. One
explanation may be due to the failure to include in the measurement those respondents
who did not finish answering the questionnaire containing all the questions related to
campaign issues.
Most of the respondents (85.7%) disagreed that there is no difference whether one
votes or not. About half (51.8%) agreed that “voting is the only way that people like
me can have any say about government running things.” More than ninety percent
(92.5%) of the respondents disagreed with the statement that “most of the time we can
trust our government to do what is right.” This result far exceeded what the author
found in the election of 2000. The same question asked of Taiwan voters that year
resulted in seventy two percent of the respondents disagreeing. Moreover, more than
half (54.7%) agreed “the government does not care about what people like me think
except during the election period.”
Demographics and Media Use
The results (Table 2a) indicate that gender and party identification significantly
predict voter terrestrial television election news attention. Age, education, and party
identification significantly predict voter exposure to the newspapers’ election
coverage. Age and party identification significantly predict voter attention to
newspaper campaign coverage as well.
The results (Table 2b) show that party identification is the only variable significantly
predicting voters’ exposure and attention to cable television election coverage. Those
that are older, and with a party identification, are likely watch more call-in television
programs. Demographics were not a good predictor of voter radio call-in behavior.
Younger and higher educated voters will use the Internet more often to access election
related news.
Age is the only demographic variable that significantly predicts voters’ perceptions of
negativism of television election coverage (Table 3). The older the voters, the more
negative comments they had toward television’s election coverage.
Regression Analysis
The hierarchical multiple regressions were used to analyze the relationships between
independent variables and the dependent variable: cynicism, voting, and satisfaction


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