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Voter Cynicism, Perception of Media Negativism and Voting Behavior in Taiwan's 2001 Election
Unformatted Document Text:  12 toward electoral process and outcome. Voter demographics, political orientation (internal efficacy, external efficacy, political interest, and party identification), traditional media use (newspaper and terrestrial election news exposure and attention), new media use (call-in television, call-in radio, Political satire shows, and Internet use) and the perceptions of media negativism (television, newspaper, and call-in shows) were the predictor variables entered into the regression model. To see whether each block produced significant changes in the R square and whether beta weights changed to determine the contributions of the individual variables in explaining the dependent variable. The influence of demographics was controlled which entered first and the last variables: media negativism entered last. Cynicism Table 4 shows the hierarchical regression equations for political cynicism. In the first block, age and education are associated with cynicism. The demographic variables as a group accounted for 5% of the variance. The political variables were entered in the second block. None of these variables were significant predictors of cynicism. The third block consisted of the use of four traditional types of media, which did not show significant predictive power in terms of voter cynicism. Once demographics, political variables, and traditional media use were controlled, it seems that people who were exposed and paid attention to cable campaign coverage showed a significant tendency toward political cynicism. This block containing the new media variables accounted for an additional 18% of the variance in cynicism (p < .05). The perceptions of media negativism were entered in the final block and showed no significant predictive power in terms of political cynicism. Actual Voting As to whether all the independent variables can predict voting patterns on Election Day, Table 5 shows that those who are older and more interested in election will vote. No media variables show significant explanatory power in predicting whether or not

Authors: Peng, Wein (Bonnie).
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toward electoral process and outcome.
Voter demographics, political orientation (internal efficacy, external efficacy, political
interest, and party identification), traditional media use (newspaper and terrestrial
election news exposure and attention), new media use (call-in television, call-in radio,
Political satire shows, and Internet use) and the perceptions of media negativism
(television, newspaper, and call-in shows) were the predictor variables entered into
the regression model. To see whether each block produced significant changes in the
R square and whether beta weights changed to determine the contributions of the
individual variables in explaining the dependent variable. The influence of
demographics was controlled which entered first and the last variables: media
negativism entered last.
Cynicism
Table 4 shows the hierarchical regression equations for political cynicism. In the
first block, age and education are associated with cynicism. The demographic
variables as a group accounted for 5% of the variance.
The political variables were entered in the second block. None of these variables were
significant predictors of cynicism. The third block consisted of the use of four
traditional types of media, which did not show significant predictive power in terms
of voter cynicism.
Once demographics, political variables, and traditional media
use were controlled, it
seems that people who were exposed and paid attention to cable campaign coverage
showed a significant tendency toward political cynicism. This block containing the
new media variables accounted for an additional 18% of the variance in cynicism (p
< .05).
The perceptions of media negativism were entered in the final block and showed no
significant predictive power in terms of political cynicism.
Actual Voting
As to whether all the independent variables can predict voting patterns on Election
Day, Table 5 shows that those who are older and more interested in election will vote.
No media variables show significant explanatory power in predicting whether or not


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