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Voter Cynicism, Perception of Media Negativism and Voting Behavior in Taiwan's 2001 Election
Unformatted Document Text:  5 p.333). Efficacy, Media Use and Voting Bowen, Stam and Clark’s (2000) study found that political efficacy played a role in defining the relationship between media and malaise. They also found that many voters harbor high levels of cynicism yet remain politically active and effective (p. 13). Political efficacy has consistently emerged as a strong predictor of political participation and voting behavior (Craig, 1979; Conway, 1991; Craig, Niemi and Silver, 1990; Rosenstone & Hansen, 1993). Most of the research studies have confirmed that the higher the political efficacy, the more active is the voters’ political participatory behavior. There is, moreover, a negative relationship between voter political efficacy and political alienation. Braima, Johnson, and Jayanthi (1999) proposed an efficacy model of electoral campaign to study the 1996 U.S. presidential election. Specially, the model predicts that interest in the campaign motivates people to search for campaign information in the media. Using information-rich media like newspapers increases both internal efficacy (the degree to which people believe they can influence the actions of politicians and the government) and external efficacy (the degree to which people perceive that the government responds to the public’s demands). Moreover, people’s belief that they can influence the political system and that the government responds to their needs leads individuals to participate more in politics as well as increases the likelihood that they will vote. Recent research on the relationship between voters’ media use and political attitudes, behavior, and cognitions has differentiated audience’s media exposure from their attention (Johnson, et al., 2000). Several scholars (Chaffee & Schleuder, 1986; McLeod & McDonald, 1985; fro. Johnson, et al., 2000) have demonstrated that attention to television is a stronger predictor of political measures than general exposure. Similarly, attention to different media content (including TV call-in shows) is typically more strongly linked to political variables than to general television use. The new media with their emphasis on audience involvement have been regarded as a form of civic participation for a growing segment of the electorate (Bucy, et al., 1999). Different media contents—such as terrestrial television campaign news, cable

Authors: Peng, Wein (Bonnie).
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p.333).
Efficacy, Media Use and Voting
Bowen, Stam and Clark’s (2000) study found that political efficacy played a role in
defining the relationship between media and malaise. They also found that many
voters harbor high levels of cynicism yet remain politically active and effective (p.
13).
Political efficacy has consistently emerged as a strong predictor of political
participation and voting behavior (Craig, 1979; Conway, 1991; Craig, Niemi and
Silver, 1990; Rosenstone & Hansen, 1993). Most of the research studies have
confirmed that the higher the political efficacy, the more active is the voters’ political
participatory behavior. There is, moreover, a negative relationship between voter
political efficacy and political alienation.
Braima, Johnson, and Jayanthi (1999) proposed an efficacy model of electoral
campaign to study the 1996 U.S. presidential election. Specially, the model predicts
that interest in the campaign motivates people to search for campaign information in
the media. Using information-rich media like newspapers increases both internal
efficacy (the degree to which people believe they can influence the actions of
politicians and the government) and external efficacy (the degree to which people
perceive that the government responds to the public’s demands). Moreover, people’s
belief that they can influence the political system and that the government responds to
their needs leads individuals to participate more in politics as well as increases the
likelihood that they will vote.
Recent research on the relationship between voters’ media use and political attitudes,
behavior, and cognitions has differentiated audience’s media exposure from their
attention (Johnson, et al., 2000). Several scholars (Chaffee & Schleuder, 1986;
McLeod & McDonald, 1985; fro. Johnson, et al., 2000) have demonstrated that
attention to television is a stronger predictor of political measures than general
exposure. Similarly, attention to different media content (including TV call-in shows)
is typically more strongly linked to political variables than to general television use.
The new media with their emphasis on audience involvement have been regarded as a
form of civic participation for a growing segment of the electorate (Bucy, et al., 1999).
Different media contents—such as terrestrial television campaign news, cable


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