Citation

Racial Borderlands: Suburban Plantation Culture and 'Rancho California (por favor)'

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Get this Document | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

This paper interrogates the spatial and iconic ways that landscape in Southern California is used inscribe, naturalize, and exploit a profitable racial caste system in San Diego County?the very border region that the ICA has chosen as its theme in 2003.

This project summarizes five years (1995-2000) of field work and media work by the author among migrant farm-workers?primarily indigenous Mixtecs from Oaxaca and Mayans from Guatemala--in northern San Diego county. Utilizing clips from the award-winning documentary Rancho California (por favor), the paper challenges two fundamental myths. The first is a mythology of commerce and public relations. California promotes its intensive agriculture as breadbasket for the nation and as a key to consumer utopia. Few realize, however, that California intensively tills and farms, not simply crops, but human labor as well. In the post-NAFTA age of globalization,?raced-labor? is, arguably, one of the state?s most important economic products. Rancho California (por favor) document several of the hundreds of farm labor camps that exist in Southern California suburbs; camps that are always slightly, and conveniently, out-of-view. In some cases, scores of families live in makeshift shacks within a few hundred feet of the gated communities that employ them in Carlsbad, La Costa, and Del Mar. In other cases several hundred indigenous Oaxacan boys live and work invisibly in vast produce farms near Fallbrook and Escondido. Rancho California (por favor) documents the organization of these camps; their functions; and the meticulous ways that this human product is cultivated by managed deprivation on the margins. Far from the high-tech start-ups, race-labor has always been California?s most central ?synergy.?

This paper and visual presentation also questions a second set of favored academic mythologies. A slate of easy truisms characterize documentary theories of the past 15 years, such as: the problematic representation of the ?other?; the stylizing and constructed nature of documentary ?actuality?; the problem of speaking with any voice voice that is not, in some ways, also autobiographical of reflexive. These celebrated postmodern notions in documentary emanate from models of post-structuralism that have spurred an even more extensive (but no less problematic) orthodoxy in media critical studies: of semiotic openness; of textual rather than political oppositionality; of reception as an unstable shifting and defined by a mulitiplicity of reading positions. And while visible evidence from the arroyos in Rancho California (por favor) demonstrates how power works through public constructions, it does not leave one much confidence in academic notions of multiplicity and openness. The ?signs? of power in this raced landscape, that is, are also literal containers for worker bodies. These ?texts? are also chain-linked barriers for families. The creative, ?counter-practices? of these California campesinos, are also acknowledged parts of many local economies. They are, however, seldom recognized on the ground as acts of symbolic resistance.

Tying the immigrant/race-issue to specific, explosive political initiatives?like prop 187, prop 209?that erupt and fade from the headlines, risks ignoring the long, economically productive (but apparently invisible) daily ?habits? of California?s racial formation. Rather than looking at landscape as a place where racism happens, this paper shows how landscape?as enacted by zoning commissions, community associations, and corporations, and as fenced by growers?is also the means by which racism is ?performed? and in some cases, celebrated. ?Performativity,? far from being limited to subject sexuality positions in the way that Judith Butler describes, also characterizes a contested social space that is dramatically physical rather than abstract.

II. A/V Needs for Conference:

I will bring clips on VHS tape for screening; so will need VCR/remote and slide projector/remote for this panel.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

media (62), communiti (57), project (49), racial (46), one (44), work (42), garden (41), indigen (38), way (37), california (36), cultur (34), migrant (33), camp (33), also (27), new (26), borderlands/10/9/03 (26), mani (25), use (24), live (24), video (23), worker (23),

Author's Keywords:

migrant camps, racial politics, suburbia, indigenous labor, immigration,
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111834_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Caldwell, John. "Racial Borderlands: Suburban Plantation Culture and 'Rancho California (por favor)'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111834_index.html>

APA Citation:

Caldwell, J. T. , 2003-05-27 "Racial Borderlands: Suburban Plantation Culture and 'Rancho California (por favor)'" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111834_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper interrogates the spatial and iconic ways that landscape in Southern California is used inscribe, naturalize, and exploit a profitable racial caste system in San Diego County?the very border region that the ICA has chosen as its theme in 2003.

This project summarizes five years (1995-2000) of field work and media work by the author among migrant farm-workers?primarily indigenous Mixtecs from Oaxaca and Mayans from Guatemala--in northern San Diego county. Utilizing clips from the award-winning documentary Rancho California (por favor), the paper challenges two fundamental myths. The first is a mythology of commerce and public relations. California promotes its intensive agriculture as breadbasket for the nation and as a key to consumer utopia. Few realize, however, that California intensively tills and farms, not simply crops, but human labor as well. In the post-NAFTA age of globalization,?raced-labor? is, arguably, one of the state?s most important economic products. Rancho California (por favor) document several of the hundreds of farm labor camps that exist in Southern California suburbs; camps that are always slightly, and conveniently, out-of-view. In some cases, scores of families live in makeshift shacks within a few hundred feet of the gated communities that employ them in Carlsbad, La Costa, and Del Mar. In other cases several hundred indigenous Oaxacan boys live and work invisibly in vast produce farms near Fallbrook and Escondido. Rancho California (por favor) documents the organization of these camps; their functions; and the meticulous ways that this human product is cultivated by managed deprivation on the margins. Far from the high-tech start-ups, race-labor has always been California?s most central ?synergy.?

This paper and visual presentation also questions a second set of favored academic mythologies. A slate of easy truisms characterize documentary theories of the past 15 years, such as: the problematic representation of the ?other?; the stylizing and constructed nature of documentary ?actuality?; the problem of speaking with any voice voice that is not, in some ways, also autobiographical of reflexive. These celebrated postmodern notions in documentary emanate from models of post-structuralism that have spurred an even more extensive (but no less problematic) orthodoxy in media critical studies: of semiotic openness; of textual rather than political oppositionality; of reception as an unstable shifting and defined by a mulitiplicity of reading positions. And while visible evidence from the arroyos in Rancho California (por favor) demonstrates how power works through public constructions, it does not leave one much confidence in academic notions of multiplicity and openness. The ?signs? of power in this raced landscape, that is, are also literal containers for worker bodies. These ?texts? are also chain-linked barriers for families. The creative, ?counter-practices? of these California campesinos, are also acknowledged parts of many local economies. They are, however, seldom recognized on the ground as acts of symbolic resistance.

Tying the immigrant/race-issue to specific, explosive political initiatives?like prop 187, prop 209?that erupt and fade from the headlines, risks ignoring the long, economically productive (but apparently invisible) daily ?habits? of California?s racial formation. Rather than looking at landscape as a place where racism happens, this paper shows how landscape?as enacted by zoning commissions, community associations, and corporations, and as fenced by growers?is also the means by which racism is ?performed? and in some cases, celebrated. ?Performativity,? far from being limited to subject sexuality positions in the way that Judith Butler describes, also characterizes a contested social space that is dramatically physical rather than abstract.

II. A/V Needs for Conference:

I will bring clips on VHS tape for screening; so will need VCR/remote and slide projector/remote for this panel.

Get this Document:

Find this citation or document at one or all of these locations below. The links below may have the citation or the entire document for free or you may purchase access to the document. Clicking on these links will change the site you're on and empty your shopping cart.

Associated Document Available Access Fee All Academic Inc.

Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 26
Word count: 10826
Text sample:
“Racial Borderlands: Race Space and Rancho California (por favor)” “We (would) pick up pieces of bread in the garbage. We lived in the fields. We would make holes like gophers. We lived under the dirt we would cover ourselves with a carton.” --Migrant’s description of design of California home “It’s like giving free room-service to someone’s who has broken into a hotel.” --California Governor Pete Wilson on immigration This paper interrogates the spatial geographic and iconic ways that landscape
more than Spanish. And as demonstrated today the Oaxacans remain rooted in their customs. 34 Arturo recounted the way he brought these issues into the camps: “Sometimes I'll say "you have a problem right?" They say "no I don't have a problem." "You ma'am excuse me but in this country we have rights." “You have the right to legally complain.” 35 Sergio knew exactly where the key pressure-point was that maintained the system in California: the system of contracting


Similar Titles:
Video Game Culture as Popular Culture? The Productive Leisure of Video Game Workers of Montreal

The Historical Continuities and Discontinuities of White Working Class Culture: Acceptance and Rejection of Diverse Community and Work Environment

Culturally Relevant Curriculum Infusion Project and Culture Camp Experience for Professors

Wanted: Methodologies that Accurately Measure the Role of Media in the Real Lives of Migrants in their Communities


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.