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Accounting Episodes as Communicative Practice Affecting Cultural Knowledge
Unformatted Document Text:  10 [My American classmate and I] went to the library by bike from the center city and were studying together. Then I got tired, tired of studying, and thought about going home. We were studying on different floors. I looked for him but couldn’t find him, so I went home by myself. I thought that he was optimistic and so would figure out that I had gone home and probably would go home by himself, too.... I didn’t care much about it but then I found he was very angry. He said, “It’s ridiculous!”.... He asked me, “What happened yesterday?” I said, “I went home.” He was like, “Why? I was there. I told you to tell me when you go home.” He said he couldn’t believe what I did. I was like, “Sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry.” In the end, he said, “That’s OK.” When I asked Masato why he went home without telling his classmate, Masato stated as follows: Excerpt 3(b) #9(Masato) pp. 25-27 I thought most Americans are optimistic and don’t really care about little things compared with Japanese. So I thought even if I did such a thing, he wouldn’t be angry and would go home, but it turned out to be wrong. When I asked Masato what he thought about this incident, he said as follows: Excerpt 3(c) #9(Masato) pp. 25-27 I learned, “OK, there are sensitive people regardless of whether he is Japanese or American. There are people who feel lonely everywhere.... So basically in dealing with people it’s better not to have a stereotype like Americans are this and that. The offense Masato committed was having gone home by himself without telling his classmate about it. He “didn’t care much about it” but was confronted by the classmate the next day and found that he was “very angry.” By engaging in this accounting episode, Masato realized the boundary that he had assumed between him and his classmate prior to this incident. His saying, “I thought most Americans are optimistic and don’t

Authors: Kotani, Mariko.
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10
[My American classmate and I] went to the library by
bike from the center city and were studying together.
Then I got tired, tired of studying, and thought about
going home. We were studying on different floors. I
looked for him but couldn’t find him, so I went home
by myself. I thought that he was optimistic and so
would figure out that I had gone home and probably
would go home by himself, too.... I didn’t care much
about it but then I found he was very angry. He said,
“It’s ridiculous!”.... He asked me, “What happened
yesterday?” I said, “I went home.” He was like, “Why?
I was there. I told you to tell me when you go home.”
He said he couldn’t believe what I did. I was like,
“Sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry, sorry.” In the end, he
said, “That’s OK.”
When I asked Masato why he went home without telling his
classmate, Masato stated as follows:
Excerpt 3(b) #9(Masato) pp. 25-27

I thought most Americans are optimistic and don’t
really care about little things compared with Japanese.
So I thought even if I did such a thing, he wouldn’t
be angry and would go home, but it turned out to be
wrong.
When I asked Masato what he thought about this incident,
he said as follows:
Excerpt 3(c) #9(Masato) pp. 25-27
I learned, “OK, there are sensitive people regardless
of whether he is Japanese or American. There are people
who feel lonely everywhere.... So basically in dealing
with people it’s better not to have a stereotype like
Americans are this and that.
The offense Masato committed was having gone home by
himself without telling his classmate about it. He “didn’t care
much about it” but was confronted by the classmate the next day
and found that he was “very angry.” By engaging in this
accounting episode, Masato realized the boundary that he had
assumed between him and his classmate prior to this incident.
His saying, “I thought most Americans are optimistic and don’t


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