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Accounting Episodes as Communicative Practice Affecting Cultural Knowledge
Unformatted Document Text:  13 If it were in Japanese I could ask in a soft tone of voice like, “Do you have money?” Americans are straightforward, so I don’t know how to say politely [in English], “Give the money back to me”.... Maybe it’s not harsh in English but if we translate it, it sounds harsh, like, “Give it back.” The other day we ordered a pizza with a roommate and other people. We each paid five dollar. Then one of them didn’t have five dollar, so I paid ten. She still hasn’t paid it back to me. I always feel, “I have to tell her, I have to tell her,” but... The problematic events Yoko experienced were that her friends did not give her back the book or money that she had lent. Yoko could not confront them to deal with these problematic situations, as evidenced by her saying, “Every time I saw her I couldn’t say it” and “I always feel, ‘I have to tell her, I have to tell her,’ but....” In explaining the reason why she had not engaged in an accounting episode, she made her language ability relevant. In other words, she implied that she would confront others in a soft tone of voice if it were in Japanese; In reality, though, she could not because she did not know how to ask in English without sounding harsh. In this problematic situation Yoko did not engage in an accounting episode, and we do not see an evidence for which her cultural knowledge was affected in any way. In the following excerpt, Hiroko, another informant who had been in the United States for a year, described an episode in which she had not blamed her classmate who had committed an offense to her. I use it to demonstrate how her cultural knowledge was not affected and rather reinforced as a result of her not engaging further in an accounting episode. Excerpt 5 #10(Hiroko) pp. 5-7

Authors: Kotani, Mariko.
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13
If it were in Japanese I could ask in a soft tone
of voice like, “Do you have money?” Americans are
straightforward, so I don’t know how to say
politely [in English], “Give the money back to
me”.... Maybe it’s not harsh in English but if we
translate it, it sounds harsh, like, “Give it
back.” The other day we ordered a pizza with a
roommate and other people. We each paid five
dollar. Then one of them didn’t have five dollar,
so I paid ten. She still hasn’t paid it back to me.
I always feel, “I have to tell her, I have to tell
her,” but...
The problematic events Yoko experienced were that her
friends did not give her back the book or money that she had
lent. Yoko could not confront them to deal with these
problematic situations, as evidenced by her saying, “Every time
I saw her I couldn’t say it” and “I always feel, ‘I have to tell
her, I have to tell her,’ but....” In explaining the reason why
she had not engaged in an accounting episode, she made her
language ability relevant. In other words, she implied that she
would confront others in a soft tone of voice if it were in
Japanese; In reality, though, she could not because she did not
know how to ask in English without sounding harsh. In this
problematic situation Yoko did not engage in an accounting
episode, and we do not see an evidence for which her cultural
knowledge was affected in any way.
In the following excerpt, Hiroko, another informant who
had been in the United States for a year, described an episode
in which she had not blamed her classmate who had committed an
offense to her. I use it to demonstrate how her cultural
knowledge was not affected and rather reinforced as a result
of her not engaging further in an accounting episode.
Excerpt 5 #10(Hiroko) pp. 5-7


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