All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Racial Borderlands: Suburban Plantation Culture and 'Rancho California (por favor)'
Unformatted Document Text:  Racial Borderlands/10/9/03, p.13 Oaxacan dances to ceremonially bless and inaugurate the garden. Many participants came to the microphone and PA to reflect on how the La Cosecha Nuestra project had formed a community and "family" where none had existed before. 22 The La Cosecha Nuestra project had absolutely none of the financial or technical infrastructure needed for even a fleeting foray into the world of the Net or cyberculture. This was a instead a world of rented apartments (many without phones); a world where composting and tilling (rather than Web surfing or videogaming) served as activities for families with small children. Yet electronic media functioned in the La Cosecha Nuestra community in three important ways. First, the project utilized interactivity far beyond purely technical interfaces, in filmed improvisational scenes and interview situations. Interactivity served as well as a working guide in door-to-door surveys, focus groups, and dialogues between workers and "story editors." Second, documentation of oral histories—involving memories of growing up, curative recipes, and gardening and horticulture wisdom--provided a foundational, "narrative network database" from which visual, sound, and scripted representations of this community emerged. Third, active involvement by 30- 40 community participants--many indigenous Oaxacan and Guatemalan workers--made the electronic production that resulted a model for "multiple user" interactivity in the social sphere. The emphasis of La Cosecha Nuestra was not on using media technologies, but rather on a composite form of civic engineering and coalition building by numerous participants. La Cosecha Nuestra animated a social force and coalition that appropriated the unseen--but far from unvirtual--land of vacant lots overlooked by institutional bureaucracies. La Cosecha Nuestra was very much an interactive, narrativized, multi-user, databased network--and a self-empowered community--in the fullest sense of those words. 23 Throughout the year in Escondido these characteristics turned the project into a political football for various bureaucratic factions. Social service advocates and non-profits recognized the importance of the needs of this low-income population. Official recognition of the city by the funders of Project Cosecha Nuestra gave the city the opportunity to take credit for someone else's forward

Authors: Caldwell, John.
first   previous   Page 13 of 26   next   last



background image
Racial Borderlands/10/9/03, p.13
Oaxacan dances to ceremonially bless and inaugurate the garden. Many participants came to the
microphone and PA to reflect on how the La Cosecha Nuestra project had formed a community and
"family" where none had existed before.
22
The La Cosecha Nuestra project had absolutely none of the financial or technical
infrastructure needed for even a fleeting foray into the world of the Net or cyberculture. This was a
instead a world of rented apartments (many without phones); a world where composting and tilling
(rather than Web surfing or videogaming) served as activities for families with small children. Yet
electronic media functioned in the La Cosecha Nuestra community in three important ways. First,
the project utilized interactivity far beyond purely technical interfaces, in filmed improvisational
scenes and interview situations. Interactivity served as well as a working guide in door-to-door
surveys, focus groups, and dialogues between workers and "story editors." Second,
documentation of oral histories—involving memories of growing up, curative recipes, and gardening
and horticulture wisdom--provided a foundational, "narrative network database" from which visual,
sound, and scripted representations of this community emerged. Third, active involvement by 30-
40 community participants--many indigenous Oaxacan and Guatemalan workers--made the
electronic production that resulted a model for "multiple user" interactivity in the social sphere. The
emphasis of La Cosecha Nuestra was not on using media technologies, but rather on a composite
form of civic engineering and coalition building by numerous participants. La Cosecha Nuestra
animated a social force and coalition that appropriated the unseen--but far from unvirtual--land of
vacant lots overlooked by institutional bureaucracies. La Cosecha Nuestra was very much an
interactive, narrativized, multi-user, databased network--and a self-empowered community--in the
fullest sense of those words.
23
Throughout the year in Escondido these characteristics turned the project into a political
football for various bureaucratic factions. Social service advocates and non-profits recognized the
importance of the needs of this low-income population. Official recognition of the city by the funders
of Project Cosecha Nuestra gave the city the opportunity to take credit for someone else's forward


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 13 of 26   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.