All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Racial Borderlands: Suburban Plantation Culture and 'Rancho California (por favor)'
Unformatted Document Text:  Racial Borderlands/10/9/03, p.18 IV. Activist Politics 2: Global Indigenism El Frente Indigena Oaxaqueno Binacional was perhaps the most provocative challenge to alternative media norms that I encountered during these years. The Frente threw a wrench into my fairly traditional notions of what solidarity (among different marginalized groups) might mean, and gave me a profound appreciation for tactical uses of racial and indigenous identity and strategic uses of globalization. In almost every camp that I visited, I asked if residents wanted to contact the UFW (United Farm Workers union) or rural legal advocates who might assist in improving their plight. In every instance the response, was “no.” At first, I attributed this to obvious suspicions about being discovered by anyone, but later learned that this was a systematic part of the public profile of most of the indigenous Mixtecos in the area. The Frente worked to protect the rights of indigenous, dialect- speaking workers, many of whom did not understand the Spanish language that their Latino crew- bosses, foreman, and contractors spoke. 28 Organizers explained how this separatism was built on centuries of violent discrimination perpetrated against the Mixtecos, first by their genocidal enemies the Aztecs, and then by years of racial domination by the Spanish and then Mexican governments. This racial caste system has simply been imported from the mountains of Oaxaca, to large farms in the state of Sinaloa, Mexico, to contemporary work environments in California. 29 Stories of Mixtecos being marketed by crew-bosses and sub-contractors around California as “the perfect picking machines” because they were “so close to the ground” (short in stature) were common in the mid- 1990s. Long-time Mixteco organizer Sergio Mendez, explained the resolute strategy of organizing against this imported racial status quo: the Frente (not the UFW, unions, American non-profits, or other Latino associations) was the “only” organization that could legitimately represent the indigenous workers. 30 While such a posture might smack of racial essentialism and separatism, it is best understood by considering the stance as part of the Frente’s “binational” scheme. Their model of binationalism is based on the ancient Mixteco tradition of “tequio”—an obligation which expects each man to return to his home village in Oaxaca every several years to work in community development

Authors: Caldwell, John.
first   previous   Page 18 of 26   next   last



background image
Racial Borderlands/10/9/03, p.18
IV. Activist Politics 2: Global Indigenism
El Frente Indigena Oaxaqueno Binacional was perhaps the most provocative challenge to
alternative media norms that I encountered during these years. The Frente threw a wrench into my
fairly traditional notions of what solidarity (among different marginalized groups) might mean, and
gave me a profound appreciation for tactical uses of racial and indigenous identity and strategic uses
of globalization. In almost every camp that I visited, I asked if residents wanted to contact the UFW
(United Farm Workers union) or rural legal advocates who might assist in improving their plight. In
every instance the response, was “no.” At first, I attributed this to obvious suspicions about being
discovered by anyone, but later learned that this was a systematic part of the public profile of most of
the indigenous Mixtecos in the area. The Frente worked to protect the rights of indigenous, dialect-
speaking workers, many of whom did not understand the Spanish language that their Latino crew-
bosses, foreman, and contractors spoke.
28
Organizers explained how this separatism was built on
centuries of violent discrimination perpetrated against the Mixtecos, first by their genocidal enemies
the Aztecs, and then by years of racial domination by the Spanish and then Mexican governments.
This racial caste system has simply been imported from the mountains of Oaxaca, to large farms in
the state of Sinaloa, Mexico, to contemporary work environments in California.
29
Stories of Mixtecos
being marketed by crew-bosses and sub-contractors around California as “the perfect picking
machines” because they were “so close to the ground” (short in stature) were common in the mid-
1990s. Long-time Mixteco organizer Sergio Mendez, explained the resolute strategy of organizing
against this imported racial status quo: the Frente (not the UFW, unions, American non-profits, or
other Latino associations) was the “only” organization that could legitimately represent the
indigenous workers.
30
While such a posture might smack of racial essentialism and separatism, it is best
understood by considering the stance as part of the Frente’s “binational” scheme. Their model of
binationalism is based on the ancient Mixteco tradition of “tequio”—an obligation which expects each
man to return to his home village in Oaxaca every several years to work in community development


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 18 of 26   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.