All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Racial Borderlands: Suburban Plantation Culture and 'Rancho California (por favor)'
Unformatted Document Text:  Racial Borderlands/10/9/03, p.20 "counter" identities are formed by emergent passersby. It is also a well-guarded, "half-way house"; where proper values are cultivated; where racial identity is tended; and processed; with great care. These resilient trends cannot be countered, I would argue, only through simple effacement tactics (of giving the camcorders to community members for participatory productions). After all, the Newscorp/Fox and Viacom/MTV conglomerates do this sort of thing with celebrities and others on TV—and no one would accuse them of using this genre of camcorder “democracy” to produce progressive shows. Participatory community media projects have their place, as the Escondido projects showed. But the provisional nature of such projects also begs for a different kind of critical production voice as well. The complicated raced landscape that I found myself tangled up in, in Southern California, can easily accommodate (and ignore) the sometimes simplistic binary categories we have always dragged out to define alternative and counter-media. These binaries have tended to cultivate notions of clean insides and outsides; dominant and oppressed groups; majority and minority discourses; mass deception and authentic expression. My experience in the suburban campo suggests that many folks (even if unintentionally) slip and slide across all of these categories. This dynamic is, arguably, a central component in building the kind of broad and unreflective consensus that perpetuates and maintains the migrant race camps. The kind of meticulously managed system of landscape and racial servitude in these suburbs elegantly asserts one ostensibly timeless lesson: that the situation is “nobody’s fault.” New kinds of critical, alternative media can show how the situation is, in fact, “everybody’s responsibility.” The media projects examined here, unsettled many of my initial assumptions about “alternative media”—as a theoretical concept, as media practice, and as a political project. These correctives left me with the nagging sense that it is absolutely essential, when engaged in alternative media work, to attend to the spatial and institutional contexts that inflect and complicate any local media project. As I discovered, attending to the actual complexities these “real” locations—showed how systematically the same spaces were being effaced. This dual activity (of

Authors: Caldwell, John.
first   previous   Page 20 of 26   next   last



background image
Racial Borderlands/10/9/03, p.20
"counter" identities are formed by emergent passersby. It is also a well-guarded, "half-way house";
where proper values are cultivated; where racial identity is tended; and processed; with great care.
These resilient trends cannot be countered, I would argue, only through simple effacement tactics
(of giving the camcorders to community members for participatory productions). After all, the
Newscorp/Fox and Viacom/MTV conglomerates do this sort of thing with celebrities and others on
TV—and no one would accuse them of using this genre of camcorder “democracy” to produce
progressive shows.
Participatory community media projects have their place, as the Escondido projects showed.
But the provisional nature of such projects also begs for a different kind of critical production voice
as well. The complicated raced landscape that I found myself tangled up in, in Southern California,
can easily accommodate (and ignore) the sometimes simplistic binary categories we have always
dragged out to define alternative and counter-media. These binaries have tended to cultivate
notions of clean insides and outsides; dominant and oppressed groups; majority and minority
discourses; mass deception and authentic expression. My experience in the suburban campo
suggests that many folks (even if unintentionally) slip and slide across all of these categories. This
dynamic is, arguably, a central component in building the kind of broad and unreflective consensus
that perpetuates and maintains the migrant race camps. The kind of meticulously managed system
of landscape and racial servitude in these suburbs elegantly asserts one ostensibly timeless lesson:
that the situation is “nobody’s fault.” New kinds of critical, alternative media can show how the
situation is, in fact, “everybody’s responsibility.”
The media projects examined here, unsettled many of my initial assumptions about
“alternative media”—as a theoretical concept, as media practice, and as a political project. These
correctives left me with the nagging sense that it is absolutely essential, when engaged in
alternative media work, to attend to the spatial and institutional contexts that inflect and complicate
any local media project. As I discovered, attending to the actual complexities these “real”
locations—showed how systematically the same spaces were being effaced. This dual activity (of


Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 20 of 26   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.