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Agenda setting and political partisanship in an election campaign: Reinforcing and undermining partisan voting intentions
Unformatted Document Text:  14 Tests for the simple effects of target indicated that partisan groups differentiated between their support for the Government and Opposition response on these issues, Fs 4.94, ps < .03. However, as can be seen in Figure 1, while Liberal partisans and neutral voters supported the Government response more than the Opposition response, this pattern was reversed for Labor partisans. Further, while Labor partisans reported significantly less support for the Government response than their Liberal counterparts, they did not demonstrate any significant countervailing preference for the Opposition response. In fact, Labor partisans reported less personal support for the Opposition on the issue of defense than their Liberal counterparts and on both issues, Liberal partisans, η 2 = .41 and .33, demonstrated significantly more ingroup bias than Labor partisans, η 2 = .05 and .04. ____________________ Figure 1 here ____________________ A similar pattern was evident on confidence in the two political leaders (see Figure 2). Significant main effects for leader, F(1,181) = 35.06, p = .000, η 2 = .16, and for partisanship, F(2,181) = 12.32, p = .000, η 2 = .12, were fully qualified by a significant two-way interaction between the factors, F(2,181) = 172.37, p = .000, η 2 = .66. All groups differentiated between their support for the Government and Opposition leader, Fs 12.49, ps < .001. However, while Liberal partisans and, to a lesser extent, neutral voters, reported significantly more confidence in John Howard than in Kim Beazley, Labor partisans showed a reverse pattern of significantly more confidence in Kim Beazley. Further, while Labor and Liberal partisans showed more support than their partisan counterparts for their ingroup leader, Liberal partisans, η 2 = .66, showed more ingroup bias than Labor partisans, η 2 = .30. ____________________ Figure 2 here ____________________ The pattern of ingroup confidence among Liberal partisans and caution among Labor partisans was also reflected to some degree in respondents’ self-reported voting intentions. Predictably, the majority of political partisans reported that they intended to vote for their own party, with a small minority indicating that they would vote for a minor party or independent. However, the proportion indicating that they intended to vote in a partisan fashion was

Authors: Duck, Julie., Morton, Thomas. and Fortey, Kate.
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14
Tests for the simple effects of target indicated that partisan groups differentiated between
their support for the Government and Opposition response on these issues, Fs
4.94, ps < .03.
However, as can be seen in Figure 1, while Liberal partisans and neutral voters supported the
Government response more than the Opposition response, this pattern was reversed for Labor
partisans. Further, while Labor partisans reported significantly less support for the Government
response than their Liberal counterparts, they did not demonstrate any significant countervailing
preference for the Opposition response. In fact, Labor partisans reported less personal support
for the Opposition on the issue of defense than their Liberal counterparts and on both issues,
Liberal partisans,
η
2
= .41 and .33, demonstrated significantly more ingroup bias than Labor
partisans,
η
2
= .05 and .04.
____________________
Figure 1 here
____________________
A similar pattern was evident on confidence in the two political leaders (see Figure 2).
Significant main effects for leader, F(1,181) = 35.06, p = .000,
η
2
= .16, and for partisanship,
F(2,181) = 12.32, p = .000,
η
2
= .12, were fully qualified by a significant two-way interaction
between the factors, F(2,181) = 172.37, p = .000,
η
2
= .66. All groups differentiated between
their support for the Government and Opposition leader, Fs
12.49, ps < .001. However, while
Liberal partisans and, to a lesser extent, neutral voters, reported significantly more confidence in
John Howard than in Kim Beazley, Labor partisans showed a reverse pattern of significantly
more confidence in Kim Beazley. Further, while Labor and Liberal partisans showed more
support than their partisan counterparts for their ingroup leader, Liberal partisans,
η
2
= .66,
showed more ingroup bias than Labor partisans,
η
2
= .30.
____________________
Figure 2 here
____________________
The pattern of ingroup confidence among Liberal partisans and caution among Labor
partisans was also reflected to some degree in respondents’ self-reported voting intentions.
Predictably, the majority of political partisans reported that they intended to vote for their own
party, with a small minority indicating that they would vote for a minor party or independent.
However, the proportion indicating that they intended to vote in a partisan fashion was


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