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Agenda Setting Effects on Online Users: The analysis of the World Cup coverage and online discussions
Unformatted Document Text:  XZ News articles on World Cup teams were collected from the New York Times and the Washington Post from June 2 nd to June 15 th in 2002. The reason two print media were selected was because most broadcasting media didn’t cover the World Cup as comprehensively as newspapers. Only ESPN had exclusive rights to cover the entire games. However, even ESPN didn’t allocate much time to the World Cup news. Most matches were aired through ESPN2. On the other hand, the New York Times and the Washington Post reported on the World Cup broadly including news on other teams besides the U.S. team. These two elite media also could represent most other media due to inter-media agenda setting (Danielian and Reese, 1989). Roberts, Wanta and Dzwo (2002) used the New York Times, AP, Reuters, Time magazine, and CNN as representative media, and Bichard (2002) analyzed the New York Times and the Washington Post in her online agenda setting study. The sampling period was determined as 14 days, during which two newspapers covered every match in the first round of World Cup except the match of France and Senegal. All matches in the first round were held from May 31 st to June 14 th . Except for the first day of the World Cup when France played Senegal (May 31 st ), three or four matches were held every day. This study focuses on how media coverage of six to eight teams of the day affected online discussions about the same six to eight teams. For this reason, the coverage on May 31 st (issue published on June 1 st ) was excluded because only two teams, France and Senegal, had a match. Article collection was conducted by searching the Lexus Nexus news database with the keyword “World Cup” in the headline and lead category. The New York Times produced 80 articles, and the Washington Post yielded 104 articles. Among these, articles not directly related to the World Cup teams were excluded. Such articles on

Authors: Lee, Jong Hyuk. and Choi, Yun Jung.
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background image
XZ
News articles on World Cup teams were collected from the New York Times and
the Washington Post from June 2
nd
to June 15
th
in 2002. The reason two print media
were selected was because most broadcasting media didn’t cover the World Cup as
comprehensively as newspapers. Only ESPN had exclusive rights to cover the entire
games. However, even ESPN didn’t allocate much time to the World Cup news. Most
matches were aired through ESPN2. On the other hand, the New York Times and the
Washington Post reported on the World Cup broadly including news on other teams
besides the U.S. team. These two elite media also could represent most other media due
to inter-media agenda setting (Danielian and Reese, 1989). Roberts, Wanta and Dzwo
(2002) used the New York Times, AP, Reuters, Time magazine, and CNN as
representative media, and Bichard (2002) analyzed the New York Times and the
Washington Post in her online agenda setting study.
The sampling period was determined as 14 days, during which two newspapers
covered every match in the first round of World Cup except the match of France and
Senegal. All matches in the first round were held from May 31
st
to June 14
th
. Except for
the first day of the World Cup when France played Senegal (May 31
st
), three or four
matches were held every day. This study focuses on how media coverage of six to eight
teams of the day affected online discussions about the same six to eight teams. For this
reason, the coverage on May 31
st
(issue published on June 1
st
) was excluded because
only two teams, France and Senegal, had a match.
Article collection was conducted by searching the Lexus Nexus news database
with the keyword “World Cup” in the headline and lead category. The New York Times
produced 80 articles, and the Washington Post yielded 104 articles. Among these,
articles not directly related to the World Cup teams were excluded. Such articles on


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