All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Framing Problems in Crisis Negotiation: Reframing in the Case of Waco
Unformatted Document Text:  Reframing in the Waco Negotiations 8 Moving beyond the articulation of competing frames, a next step would be to look more closely at the interaction in the negotiations that enacted the problems the FBI had with different frames. Examining the interaction would reveal not only the parties’ different frames, but also their framing activities. This analytical shift brings into focus the negotiations as a display of communication practices and how those practices function to reveal problems. It shifts the focus away from the situational problems the FBI experienced in the standoff, which have already been made clear, towards the interactional problems in the negotiations. Materials and Method During the standoff the FBI taped all telephone exchanges between their agents and persons in the compound, most often David Koresh or Steve Scheneider 3 . These negotiations, with the exception of a small set of calls, are available for public access from the FBI. The data for my study draws on roughly 200 hours of taped negotiations. Conversations were logged by date, approximate time of day, and tape number. Participants and topics of talk were also noted. This afforded me a big picture view of a coherent flow of events and relevant issues. As a supplement, I also draw upon the four-volume, 750 page incident report issued by the FBI (U.S. Department of Justice, 1993a, 1993b, 1993c, 1993d) after the standoff. A set of 5- to 30-minute exchanges, totaling approximately 5 hours, was selected from the tapes and transcripts of the negotiations in order to focus on moments in which negotiators experienced framing problems. By examining the negotiation logs and transcripts, moments were chosen in which the parties’ differing ideas about the problem of the standoff, how the negotiations should proceed, coming out of the compound, or otherwise resolving the standoff stood out as particularly frustrating or troublesome for the negotiators. Many interactions were described as “heated” or “tense.” Others, while noted as more calm, were also noted as

Authors: Agne, Robert.
first   previous   Page 10 of 36   next   last



background image
Reframing in the Waco Negotiations 8
Moving beyond the articulation of competing frames, a next step would be to look more
closely at the interaction in the negotiations that enacted the problems the FBI had with different
frames. Examining the interaction would reveal not only the parties’ different frames, but also
their framing activities. This analytical shift brings into focus the negotiations as a display of
communication practices and how those practices function to reveal problems. It shifts the focus
away from the situational problems the FBI experienced in the standoff, which have already been
made clear, towards the interactional problems in the negotiations.
Materials and Method
During the standoff the FBI taped all telephone exchanges between their agents and
persons in the compound, most often David Koresh or Steve Scheneider
3
. These negotiations,
with the exception of a small set of calls, are available for public access from the FBI. The data
for my study draws on roughly 200 hours of taped negotiations. Conversations were logged by
date, approximate time of day, and tape number. Participants and topics of talk were also noted.
This afforded me a big picture view of a coherent flow of events and relevant issues. As a
supplement, I also draw upon the four-volume, 750 page incident report issued by the FBI (U.S.
Department of Justice, 1993a, 1993b, 1993c, 1993d) after the standoff.
A set of 5- to 30-minute exchanges, totaling approximately 5 hours, was selected from
the tapes and transcripts of the negotiations in order to focus on moments in which negotiators
experienced framing problems. By examining the negotiation logs and transcripts, moments
were chosen in which the parties’ differing ideas about the problem of the standoff, how the
negotiations should proceed, coming out of the compound, or otherwise resolving the standoff
stood out as particularly frustrating or troublesome for the negotiators. Many interactions were
described as “heated” or “tense.” Others, while noted as more calm, were also noted as


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 10 of 36   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.