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Framing Problems in Crisis Negotiation: Reframing in the Case of Waco
Unformatted Document Text:  Reframing in the Waco Negotiations 21 DW: David help me out. I’ve been trying to represent you. 348 DK: Dick I would love to. But you’re not representing me. God’s gonna 349 repre[sent me. 350 DW: [I know but you can help me out okay as a [personal favor to me. 351 DK: [Dick I okay look. 352 DW: As a [personal favor to me. 353 DK: [Here's how I could help you out. Would you like to know the seven 354 seals? 355 DW: Certainly. I'll be happy to learn about the Seven Seals [but I need to go to 356 my bosses 357 DK: [(Well how bout 358 then) you got do you got your bible? 359 DW: I’ll be happy to go with it but please let’s do this first 360 The making of a frame trap is found in the accounting sequence between lines 349 and 354. Koresh’s utterance in lines 349-350 resembles the form of what Morris, White, and Iltis (1994) describe as an “account for a problematic event.” They show that accounts such as Koresh’s attend to the rejection of a request, proposal, invitation, and the like, by cushioning it with the description of a problem that prevents compliance to the request, acceptance of the proposal, etc. The formula Morris et al. (1994) propose is “well, ordinarily I would, but … [there’s a problem].” “Well” forecasts the rejection and acts as a preface to the pre-rejection, “ordinarily I would, but.” “Ordinarily I would, but” cushions the coming rejection by indicating that the rejection is not a routine occurrence. Finally, the report of the non-routine trouble or problematic event, the account itself, is offered. Morris et al. (1994), also note, referring to Drew (1984), that the report is often composed in such a way that the actual rejection is implied. Koresh’s “Dick I would love to. But you’re not representing me. God’s gonna represent me” (lines 349-350) is similar in form to “Well, ordinarily I would, but.” After Wren’s request for help (line 348, “David help me out”), Koresh’s “Dick” in “Dick I would love to…” (line 349)

Authors: Agne, Robert.
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Reframing in the Waco Negotiations 21
DW: David help me out. I’ve been trying to represent you.
348
DK:
Dick I would love to. But you’re not representing me. God’s gonna
349
repre[sent me.
350
DW:
[I know but you can help me out okay as a [personal favor to me.
351
DK:
[Dick I okay look.
352
DW: As a [personal favor to me.
353
DK:
[Here's how I could help you out. Would you like to know the seven
354
seals?
355
DW: Certainly. I'll be happy to learn about the Seven Seals [but I need to go to
356
my bosses
357
DK:
[(Well how bout
358
then) you got do you got your bible?
359
DW: I’ll be happy to go with it but please let’s do this first
360
The making of a frame trap is found in the accounting sequence between lines 349 and
354. Koresh’s utterance in lines 349-350 resembles the form of what Morris, White, and Iltis
(1994) describe as an “account for a problematic event.” They show that accounts such as
Koresh’s attend to the rejection of a request, proposal, invitation, and the like, by cushioning it
with the description of a problem that prevents compliance to the request, acceptance of the
proposal, etc. The formula Morris et al. (1994) propose is “well, ordinarily I would, but …
[there’s a problem].” “Well” forecasts the rejection and acts as a preface to the pre-rejection,
“ordinarily I would, but.” “Ordinarily I would, but” cushions the coming rejection by indicating
that the rejection is not a routine occurrence. Finally, the report of the non-routine trouble or
problematic event, the account itself, is offered. Morris et al. (1994), also note, referring to Drew
(1984), that the report is often composed in such a way that the actual rejection is implied.
Koresh’s “Dick I would love to. But you’re not representing me. God’s gonna represent
me” (lines 349-350) is similar in form to “Well, ordinarily I would, but.” After Wren’s request
for help (line 348, “David help me out”), Koresh’s “Dick” in “Dick I would love to…” (line 349)


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