All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Typology of Framing Research: It needs to be tangible
Unformatted Document Text:  A Typology of Framing Research-- 5 episodic and thematic frame is made by based on nothing but a difference in perspectives or considerations. Another influential scholar, Entman (1993) submitted widely shared definition of framing—“selection and highlighting, and use of the highlighted elements to construct an argument about problems and their causation, evaluation, and/or solution” (p. 53)—also seems to produce some confusion by his arbitrary interpretation of the Kahneman and Tversky’s experiment: Kahneman and Tversky’s experiments demonstrate that frames select and call attention to particular aspects of the reality described, which logically means that frames simultaneously direct attention away from other aspects. Most frames are defined by what they omit as well as include, and the omissions of potential problem definitions, explanations, evaluations, and recommendations may be as critical as the inclusions in guiding the audience (p. 54). Although Entman (1993)’s notion appears quite tenable for the general aspects of framing, its unwitting error needs to be pointed out. Above all, the options of Asian disease problem were manipulated as equivalent, which is far from the “selection and salience of particular aspects of reality” contended by Entman (1993). Furthermore, he posited that the news can encourage particular trains of thought about political phenomena resting on how the news is framed. However, Kahneman and Tversky (1979, 1982, 1984) and Tversky and Kahneman (1981) didn’t assume an activation of frame-relevant thought. Even though there was an argument of the possibility that Kahneman and Tversky’s disease problem might invoke subjects’ schemata or scripts (e.g., Jou, Shanteau, & Harris, 1996), no evidence was reported. If you look at the following problem explained also by framing effects in Kahneman and Tversky (1984), you’ll

Authors: Choi, Jinmyung.
first   previous   Page 5 of 32   next   last



background image
A Typology of Framing Research-- 5
episodic and thematic frame is made by based on nothing but a difference in perspectives or
considerations.
Another influential scholar, Entman (1993) submitted widely shared definition of
framing—“selection and highlighting, and use of the highlighted elements to construct an
argument about problems and their causation, evaluation, and/or solution” (p. 53)—also seems to
produce some confusion by his arbitrary interpretation of the Kahneman and Tversky’s
experiment:
Kahneman and Tversky’s experiments demonstrate that frames select and call
attention to particular aspects of the reality described, which logically means that
frames simultaneously direct attention away from other aspects. Most frames are
defined by what they omit as well as include, and the omissions of potential problem
definitions, explanations, evaluations, and recommendations may be as critical as the
inclusions in guiding the audience (p. 54).
Although Entman (1993)’s notion appears quite tenable for the general aspects of framing,
its unwitting error needs to be pointed out. Above all, the options of Asian disease problem were
manipulated as equivalent, which is far from the “selection and salience of particular aspects of
reality” contended by Entman (1993). Furthermore, he posited that the news can encourage
particular trains of thought about political phenomena resting on how the news is framed.
However, Kahneman and Tversky (1979, 1982, 1984) and Tversky and Kahneman (1981) didn’t
assume an activation of frame-relevant thought. Even though there was an argument of the
possibility that Kahneman and Tversky’s disease problem might invoke subjects’ schemata or
scripts (e.g., Jou, Shanteau, & Harris, 1996), no evidence was reported. If you look at the
following problem explained also by framing effects in Kahneman and Tversky (1984), you’ll


Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 5 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.