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A Typology of Framing Research: It needs to be tangible
Unformatted Document Text:  A Typology of Framing Research-- 7 second-level, or framing, perspective offers a richer explanation of changes in public opinion” (Jasperson, Shah, Watts, Faber, & Fan, 1998, p. 210). The notion that the premise and assumption of agenda-setting and framing is fundamentally different from each other also seems tenable. Attendant to the notion is the idea that “in agenda-setting research the evaluation made is not appraisal of the president or other political actor, but rather a judgment about the relative importance of public issues” (Price & Tewksbury, 1997a, pp. 197-198), on the other hand, framing occurs during initial message processing referred to effects of the salient attribute of the message on the applicability of particular thoughts (Price & Tewksbury, 1997a; 1997b; Tewksbury, Jones, Peske, Raymond, & Vig, 2000). Furthermore, as Scheufele (2000, p. 309) argues, it looks right that “framing influences how audience think about issues, not by making aspects of the issue more salient, but by invoking interpretive schemas that influence the interpretation of incoming information.” Indeed framing research appears to have unique theoretical territory taken into consideration of the fact that subtle changes in the wording of the descriptions of a problem induced dramatic changes in decision-making which can be ascribed to prospect theory (Kahneman & Tversky, 1982, 1984). However, the notion of both sides equally seems neither deniable nor acceptable. They all implicitly assume that only unitary domain exist in framing research, which is ruled over by one dominant theoretical framework. Jumping to a conclusion, that’s not true. Now, a typology of framing research will be suggested to give a comprehensive map of framing research as well as to answer the questions raised here. A Categorization of Framing Research

Authors: Choi, Jinmyung.
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A Typology of Framing Research-- 7
second-level, or framing, perspective offers a richer explanation of changes in public opinion”
(Jasperson, Shah, Watts, Faber, & Fan, 1998, p. 210).
The notion that the premise and assumption of agenda-setting and framing is
fundamentally different from each other also seems tenable. Attendant to the notion is the idea
that “in agenda-setting research the evaluation made is not appraisal of the president or other
political actor, but rather a judgment about the relative importance of public issues” (Price &
Tewksbury, 1997a, pp. 197-198), on the other hand, framing occurs during initial message
processing referred to effects of the salient attribute of the message on the applicability of
particular thoughts (Price & Tewksbury, 1997a; 1997b; Tewksbury, Jones, Peske, Raymond, &
Vig, 2000). Furthermore, as Scheufele (2000, p. 309) argues, it looks right that “framing
influences how audience think about issues, not by making aspects of the issue more salient, but
by invoking interpretive schemas that influence the interpretation of incoming information.”
Indeed framing research appears to have unique theoretical territory taken into consideration of
the fact that subtle changes in the wording of the descriptions of a problem induced dramatic
changes in decision-making which can be ascribed to prospect theory (Kahneman & Tversky,
1982, 1984).
However, the notion of both sides equally seems neither deniable nor acceptable. They all
implicitly assume that only unitary domain exist in framing research, which is ruled over by one
dominant theoretical framework. Jumping to a conclusion, that’s not true. Now, a typology of
framing research will be suggested to give a comprehensive map of framing research as well as
to answer the questions raised here.
A Categorization of Framing Research


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