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Factors of Culture Adaptation and Adaptation States in a Multicultural Organization
Unformatted Document Text:  Cultural Adaptation Factors and States 11 Tijuana Park might be somewhat different from expatriated Korean managers from Korea. However, the possible difference between local Koreans and dispatched Koreans is not a significant issue to the purpose of this study because these two Korean sub- groups are perceived equally as “expatriated Korean managers” by Mexican workers and represent Korean culture as one group. Therefore, local and dispatched Koreans were not differentiated in this study. It should be noted that all Koreans in this study are males. Most of the Mexican employees work on assembly lines at each manufacture plant. The population of Mexican workers is almost evenly divided between males and females. Workers view border cities like Tijuana as places with more opportunities for good-paying jobs because of the maquiladora factories. For this reason, many of the Mexican workers at Samsung Tijuana Park moved to Tijuana from other parts of Mexico—typically small villages and rural areas. The average unemployment rate in Tijuana is one percent, a very low percentage when compared to the other cities in Mexico. The turnover rate, however, is relatively high—seven to ten percent— also because of abundant job opportunities. The high turnover rate is true across many companies in Tijuana, therefore, some Mexican workers at Samsung Tijuana Park have previous work experiences at other maquiladoras such as Sony, Hitachi, and Hyundai. A total of 255 respondents participated in this study. The sample included 60 Korean managers and 195 Mexican workers. The population of Korean managers is 100, therefore, 60 percent of the Korean manager group participated in this study. The participation rate of Mexican workers is about three percent of the entire population. This study used purposive sampling in order to accommodate Samsung’s usual work schedules of both managers and workers. The researchers requested that the

Authors: Zhong, Mei. and Lee, Suman.
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Cultural Adaptation Factors and States
11
Tijuana Park might be somewhat different from expatriated Korean managers from
Korea. However, the possible difference between local Koreans and dispatched Koreans
is not a significant issue to the purpose of this study because these two Korean sub-
groups are perceived equally as “expatriated Korean managers” by Mexican workers and
represent Korean culture as one group. Therefore, local and dispatched Koreans were not
differentiated in this study. It should be noted that all Koreans in this study are males.
Most of the Mexican employees work on assembly lines at each manufacture
plant. The population of Mexican workers is almost evenly divided between males and
females. Workers view border cities like Tijuana as places with more opportunities for
good-paying jobs because of the maquiladora factories. For this reason, many of the
Mexican workers at Samsung Tijuana Park moved to Tijuana from other parts of
Mexico—typically small villages and rural areas. The average unemployment rate in
Tijuana is one percent, a very low percentage when compared to the other cities in
Mexico. The turnover rate, however, is relatively high—seven to ten percent— also
because of abundant job opportunities. The high turnover rate is true across many
companies in Tijuana, therefore, some Mexican workers at Samsung Tijuana Park have
previous work experiences at other maquiladoras such as Sony, Hitachi, and Hyundai.
A total of 255 respondents participated in this study. The sample included 60
Korean managers and 195 Mexican workers. The population of Korean managers is 100,
therefore, 60 percent of the Korean manager group participated in this study. The
participation rate of Mexican workers is about three percent of the entire population.
This study used purposive sampling in order to accommodate Samsung’s usual
work schedules of both managers and workers. The researchers requested that the


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