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Factors of Culture Adaptation and Adaptation States in a Multicultural Organization
Unformatted Document Text:  Cultural Adaptation Factors and States 4 owned, but many investors come from other countries such as Japan, South Korea, Germany, and Canada. The two largest border cities  Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez  in Mexico have grown from small tourist towns into urban industrial centers within a very few years (Kras, 1995). Samsung Tijuana Park is one of the successful maquiladoras in Tijuana. This plant is part of the Samsung Group, based in South Korea. Samsung Tijuana Park was established in 1996, beginning as a manufacturing complex for electronic commodities and components for color television sets, VCRs, monitors, and tuners. The number of Mexican workers doubled between 1997 and 1999, and Samsung Tijuana Park ranked as the second largest maquiladora in Tijuana (Patta, 1999). Most Koreans are in the managing staff and the vast majority of Mexicans are workers, with a few production supervisors who serve as bridges between the management and employees. In 2000, there were approximately 100 Korean managers and 6,500 Mexican workers. Two national cultures, represented by Korean managers and Mexican employees, are the people who make up the unique Samsung-Tijuana Park culture. In Samsung Tijuana Park, Korean managers and Mexican workers are cultural “strangers” (Gudykunst & Kim, 2003) to each other. Just as individuals who migrate to a second culture, a multinational company faces challenges in the same process. In this regard, success or failure of a multinational company cannot be explained by economic factors alone. Effective intercultural communication and mutually beneficial relationships between cultural groups, especially manager-worker relationships, also serve as significant indicators for successful operation. The following section will review literature on cultural adaptation.

Authors: Zhong, Mei. and Lee, Suman.
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Cultural Adaptation Factors and States
4
owned, but many investors come from other countries such as Japan, South Korea,
Germany, and Canada. The two largest border cities
Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez
in
Mexico have grown from small tourist towns into urban industrial centers within a very
few years (Kras, 1995).
Samsung Tijuana Park is one of the successful maquiladoras in Tijuana. This
plant is part of the Samsung Group, based in South Korea. Samsung Tijuana Park was
established in 1996, beginning as a manufacturing complex for electronic commodities
and components for color television sets, VCRs, monitors, and tuners. The number of
Mexican workers doubled between 1997 and 1999, and Samsung Tijuana Park ranked as
the second largest maquiladora in Tijuana (Patta, 1999). Most Koreans are in the
managing staff and the vast majority of Mexicans are workers, with a few production
supervisors who serve as bridges between the management and employees. In 2000, there
were approximately 100 Korean managers and 6,500 Mexican workers.
Two national cultures, represented by Korean managers and Mexican employees,
are the people who make up the unique Samsung-Tijuana Park culture. In Samsung
Tijuana Park, Korean managers and Mexican workers are cultural “strangers”
(Gudykunst & Kim, 2003) to each other. Just as individuals who migrate to a second
culture, a multinational company faces challenges in the same process. In this regard,
success or failure of a multinational company cannot be explained by economic factors
alone. Effective intercultural communication and mutually beneficial relationships
between cultural groups, especially manager-worker relationships, also serve as
significant indicators for successful operation. The following section will review
literature on cultural adaptation.


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