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Feeling the Hardware: The Emotionality of Technology-Based Organizational Change
Unformatted Document Text:  Feeling the Hardware, p. 14 Gary smiled but did not say anything. Interestingly, Gary and Mary both had doubts and complaints about the system and the process of its development and implementation, too, but seemed to accept that they needed to do their best to make it work. In subsequent observations and interviews, Roxanne became much more positive about the system and, in fact, became somewhat of an expert and trainer herself, becoming a helper to several other local offices that began using CSIS after she did. However, less than a year later, she resigned. Mary said the primary reason for her resignation was that “Her morale and job satisfaction had gone downhill after CSIS.” Roxanne had hinted at this in an interview I conducted with her several months after the initial training, shortly after she had made a number of positive comments about CSIS: I have no time for anything else now. Before, I would set up rooms for meetings, general updating of application forms, getting counsellor lists, team lists, banking. Now I do banking, minutes, etcetera after hours. . . . I get stressed out a bit more – because of the extra work, because I can't see my way clear to spend my time to do the necessary things. My job is now data entry. . . . It's frustrating because I don't feel like I'm doing a good job because I can't get everything done and I can't plan ahead. Interpretation and Discussion Analysis of the case will focus on several closely related key issues. First, implementation of the new ICT system, including the emotional experience of the implementation, are inherently ambiguous and negotiable. Second, participants in organizational change attempt to influence each other's emotional experience of the change via communication. Third, participants’ emotional expression is used instrumentally to achieve their objectives, including relieving tension, connecting with co-workers, and managing power relations. Fourth, change agents engage in emotional labour to enact the

Authors: Zorn, Ted.
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Feeling the Hardware, p. 14
Gary smiled but did not say anything.
Interestingly, Gary and Mary both had doubts and complaints about the system and the
process of its development and implementation, too, but seemed to accept that they needed to
do their best to make it work. In subsequent observations and interviews, Roxanne became
much more positive about the system and, in fact, became somewhat of an expert and trainer
herself, becoming a helper to several other local offices that began using CSIS after she did.
However, less than a year later, she resigned. Mary said the primary reason for her
resignation was that “Her morale and job satisfaction had gone downhill after CSIS.”
Roxanne had hinted at this in an interview I conducted with her several months after the
initial training, shortly after she had made a number of positive comments about CSIS:
I have no time for anything else now. Before, I would set up rooms for meetings,
general updating of application forms, getting counsellor lists, team lists, banking.
Now I do banking, minutes, etcetera after hours. . . . I get stressed out a bit more –
because of the extra work, because I can't see my way clear to spend my time to do the
necessary things. My job is now data entry. . . . It's frustrating because I don't feel like
I'm doing a good job because I can't get everything done and I can't plan ahead.
Interpretation and Discussion
Analysis of the case will focus on several closely related key issues. First,
implementation of the new ICT system, including the emotional experience of the
implementation, are inherently ambiguous and negotiable. Second, participants in
organizational change attempt to influence each other's emotional experience of the change
via communication. Third, participants’ emotional expression is used instrumentally to
achieve their objectives, including relieving tension, connecting with co-workers, and
managing power relations. Fourth, change agents engage in emotional labour to enact the


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