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Feeling the Hardware: The Emotionality of Technology-Based Organizational Change
Unformatted Document Text:  Feeling the Hardware, p. 20 change agents, they carefully used the rules as resources to manage the emotional climate of the situation and frame CSIS as a system that the sorts of problems to be expected at this early stage but that ultimately would turn out to be a useful tool. Roxanne, as the one member who had not been through training as a counsellor, perhaps could be seen as a less competent communicator in frequently violating the rules proscribing negative emotional expression. Alternatively, however, she may be seen as skilfully exploiting these rules as a means of conveying that the situation is not normal—in fact, that CSIS is “rubbish” and that to implement such a system before it is working properly is unreasonable. Conclusion Emotion is a central part of our work experience, a fact that scholars have only recently acknowledged. Rather than consider it tangential to the “real work” of organisations, scholars studying emotional labour and related concepts have shown that an understanding of the dynamics of emotion is key to scholarly and practitioner understanding of organisational life. In the present article, I have demonstrated that emotion plays a key role in ICT implementation. Because of the ambiguity of emotional experience and organisational change, both are subject to influence. Organisational members—and in particular, change agents—attempt to influence others’ interpretations by drawing on commonly understood emotion display rules to achieve their goals. References Conrad, C., & Witte, K. (1994). Commentary on Waldron: Is emotional expression repression oppression? Myths of organizational affective regulation. Communication Yearbook, 17, 417-428.

Authors: Zorn, Ted.
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Feeling the Hardware, p. 20
change agents, they carefully used the rules as resources to manage the emotional climate of
the situation and frame CSIS as a system that the sorts of problems to be expected at this
early stage but that ultimately would turn out to be a useful tool.
Roxanne, as the one member who had not been through training as a counsellor,
perhaps could be seen as a less competent communicator in frequently violating the rules
proscribing negative emotional expression. Alternatively, however, she may be seen as
skilfully exploiting these rules as a means of conveying that the situation is not normal—in
fact, that CSIS is “rubbish” and that to implement such a system before it is working properly
is unreasonable.
Conclusion
Emotion is a central part of our work experience, a fact that scholars have only
recently acknowledged. Rather than consider it tangential to the “real work” of organisations,
scholars studying emotional labour and related concepts have shown that an understanding of
the dynamics of emotion is key to scholarly and practitioner understanding of organisational
life. In the present article, I have demonstrated that emotion plays a key role in ICT
implementation. Because of the ambiguity of emotional experience and organisational
change, both are subject to influence. Organisational members—and in particular, change
agents—attempt to influence others’ interpretations by drawing on commonly understood
emotion display rules to achieve their goals.
References
Conrad, C., & Witte, K. (1994). Commentary on Waldron: Is emotional
expression repression oppression? Myths of organizational affective regulation.
Communication Yearbook, 17, 417-428.


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