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Feeling the Hardware: The Emotionality of Technology-Based Organizational Change
Unformatted Document Text:  Feeling the Hardware, p. 5 that they may convey dissent or dysfunction (Hochschild, 1985; Waldron, 1994). The signals are critical for managers to monitor and interpret as change develops. Similarly, emotional expression functions to signal personal engagement and disengagement in tasks, for example when members express their enthusiasm or disgust for a particular task. Finally, Shuler and Sypher (Shuler & Sypher, 2000) have demonstrated that emotion expression may serve several positive functions such as comic relief. Thus based on prior research on emotion at work, we can expect emotional expression in the process of organizational change to function as a means of negotiating power, norms, and the moral order. Furthermore, we can expect emotional expression to signal engagement, disengagement, satisfaction, or dissatisfaction with the change, and to be used as a tool for comic relief during the challenges presented in organisational change. Prior research is also informative regarding how emotional expression serves such functions. That is, research suggests that national and organizational cultures have rules governing emotional displays that enable and constrain expression (Kramer & Hess, 2002). These rules serve as resources for organizational members, both managers and staff, to use in achieving their goals. Whereas specific rules may develop within individual organizational cultures, national or regional cultures are also likely to share rules for emotional expression. Kramer and Hess, for example, found the following generic rules apply in a large range of organizations in the U.S.: (a) Express emotions professionally (which primarily means to control emotions by avoiding extreme emotional displays), (b) express emotions to improve situations, (c) express emotions to help individuals, (d) avoid expressing emotion that may be seen as abuse (Kramer & Hess, 2002). Understanding and using these rules is important to individual success in organisations as well as to team and organisational functioning. Research on the politics of ICT implementation does not directly addressed emotion, yet such work makes abundantly clear the intense emotionality experienced in this process.

Authors: Zorn, Ted.
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Feeling the Hardware, p. 5
that they may convey dissent or dysfunction (Hochschild, 1985; Waldron, 1994). The signals
are critical for managers to monitor and interpret as change develops. Similarly, emotional
expression functions to signal personal engagement and disengagement in tasks, for example
when members express their enthusiasm or disgust for a particular task. Finally, Shuler and
Sypher (Shuler & Sypher, 2000) have demonstrated that emotion expression may serve
several positive functions such as comic relief. Thus based on prior research on emotion at
work, we can expect emotional expression in the process of organizational change to function
as a means of negotiating power, norms, and the moral order. Furthermore, we can expect
emotional expression to signal engagement, disengagement, satisfaction, or dissatisfaction
with the change, and to be used as a tool for comic relief during the challenges presented in
organisational change.
Prior research is also informative regarding how emotional expression serves such
functions. That is, research suggests that national and organizational cultures have rules
governing emotional displays that enable and constrain expression (Kramer & Hess, 2002).
These rules serve as resources for organizational members, both managers and staff, to use in
achieving their goals. Whereas specific rules may develop within individual organizational
cultures, national or regional cultures are also likely to share rules for emotional expression.
Kramer and Hess, for example, found the following generic rules apply in a large range of
organizations in the U.S.: (a) Express emotions professionally (which primarily means to
control emotions by avoiding extreme emotional displays), (b) express emotions to improve
situations, (c) express emotions to help individuals, (d) avoid expressing emotion that may be
seen as abuse (Kramer & Hess, 2002). Understanding and using these rules is important to
individual success in organisations as well as to team and organisational functioning.
Research on the politics of ICT implementation does not directly addressed emotion,
yet such work makes abundantly clear the intense emotionality experienced in this process.


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