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AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO MEDIA DISPLACEMENT STUDY: SELECTIVE DISPLACEMENT BASED ON THE NEWS CONTENT
Unformatted Document Text:  Media Displacement 2 various types of media is limited (Kayany & Yelsma, 2000). When a new media activity is introduced into our lives, we can expect a corresponding reduction in the time spent with other media activities (Kayany & Yelsma, 2000; Lee & Kuo, 2002). For instance, when radio was a new medium, Lazarsfeld (1940) studied its impact on print media in response to an argument that broadcasting would mean the end of print media. This line of inquiry was continued for every new technology- television (Belson, 1961), cable television (Kaplan, 1978; Sparkes, 1983), VCR (Harvey & Rothe, 1985; Henke & Donohue, 1989) and more recently computer mediated communication by the Internet (Finholt & Sproull, 1990; James, Wotring, & Forrest, 1995; Robinson, Barth, & Kohut, 1997). According to Roper’s public opinion data, 51% of the U.S. population reported that newspaper was their primary news source in 1937, but by 1945 radio had displaced newspapers and become the primary news source for the majority (62%) (see Basil, 1990). Apparently, a second instance of media displacement occurred when television became the primary news source for 60% of the population in 1972 (Basil, 1990). Similarly, Weiss (1968) and Robinson (1981) observed media displacement by television. Weiss (1968) found that the introduction of television into people’s schedules reduced the amount of time they spent with most other media. Robinson (1981) reported that those who spent more time watching television spent less time with other media such as radio and non-media activities such as social visiting. However, despite the logical appeal of the displacement model, research findings have not consistently lent supports for this model. Scholars challenging the media displacement theory remarked that the use of one type of media does not necessarily replace the gratifications expected from other media (see Adoni, 1995). In such a view an increase in the use of one medium does not necessarily imply a reduction in the use of another medium if that medium

Authors: Jeong, Irkwon. and Li, Zhan.
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Media Displacement
2
various types of media is limited (Kayany & Yelsma, 2000). When a new media activity is
introduced into our lives, we can expect a corresponding reduction in the time spent with other
media activities (Kayany & Yelsma, 2000; Lee & Kuo, 2002). For instance, when radio was a
new medium, Lazarsfeld (1940) studied its impact on print media in response to an argument that
broadcasting would mean the end of print media. This line of inquiry was continued for every
new technology- television (Belson, 1961), cable television (Kaplan, 1978; Sparkes, 1983), VCR
(Harvey & Rothe, 1985; Henke & Donohue, 1989) and more recently computer mediated
communication by the Internet (Finholt & Sproull, 1990; James, Wotring, & Forrest, 1995;
Robinson, Barth, & Kohut, 1997).
According to Roper’s public opinion data, 51% of the U.S. population reported that
newspaper was their primary news source in 1937, but by 1945 radio had displaced newspapers
and become the primary news source for the majority (62%) (see Basil, 1990). Apparently, a
second instance of media displacement occurred when television became the primary news
source for 60% of the population in 1972 (Basil, 1990). Similarly, Weiss (1968) and Robinson
(1981) observed media displacement by television. Weiss (1968) found that the introduction of
television into people’s schedules reduced the amount of time they spent with most other media.
Robinson (1981) reported that those who spent more time watching television spent less time
with other media such as radio and non-media activities such as social visiting.
However, despite the logical appeal of the displacement model, research findings have
not consistently lent supports for this model. Scholars challenging the media displacement
theory remarked that the use of one type of media does not necessarily replace the gratifications
expected from other media (see Adoni, 1995). In such a view an increase in the use of one
medium does not necessarily imply a reduction in the use of another medium if that medium


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