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AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO MEDIA DISPLACEMENT STUDY: SELECTIVE DISPLACEMENT BASED ON THE NEWS CONTENT
Unformatted Document Text:  Media Displacement 4 displacement by the Internet, while conversations with those at home experienced the least displacement compared to other activities. However, displacement (or reduction in time spent) is not the only possible outcome of the emergence of the Internet but merely one possible outcome (Stempel, Hargrove, & Bernt, 2000). Introduction of the Internet has led to a reduction in time spent on existing media, in a sense, which was supported in some research. Yet, evidence also shows that the use of the Internet resulted in no change or even complementation, or an increase in time spend in the use of other media. Several studies found support for a complementary relationship (increase-increase) between new and traditional media, which is exactly the opposite of the prediction of the displacement model. For example, Lee and Kuo (2002) found that a rise in Internet use is associated with an increase in newspaper reading and radio listening. Instead of displacement, they suggested that newspaper and radio use were benefiting from Internet use (Lee & Kuo, 2002). They explained that this might be due to some characteristics of newspapers and radio that make them more resistant to displacement. Althaus and Tewksbury (2000) and Bromley and Bowles (1995) also suggested that people would use online news to supplement, not replace, their core news consumption. People often go online to follow up on news they originally received from traditional media (Tewksbury, 2002). Rather, these people read online news to fill the gaps in their exposure to other media or, more likely, to monitor ongoing events (e.g., stock prices or sporting events) or breaking news (Tewksbury, 2002). Similarly, Robinson and associates (1997) found evidence of a symbiotic or complementary relationship between Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) of the Internet and print media, where each seems to reinforce the use of the other. Consistent with this

Authors: Jeong, Irkwon. and Li, Zhan.
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Media Displacement
4
displacement by the Internet, while conversations with those at home experienced the least
displacement compared to other activities.
However, displacement (or reduction in time spent) is not the only possible outcome of
the emergence of the Internet but merely one possible outcome (Stempel, Hargrove, & Bernt,
2000). Introduction of the Internet has led to a reduction in time spent on existing media, in a
sense, which was supported in some research. Yet, evidence also shows that the use of the
Internet resulted in no change or even complementation, or an increase in time spend in the use
of other media.
Several studies found support for a complementary relationship (increase-increase)
between new and traditional media, which is exactly the opposite of the prediction of the
displacement model. For example, Lee and Kuo (2002) found that a rise in Internet use is
associated with an increase in newspaper reading and radio listening. Instead of displacement,
they suggested that newspaper and radio use were benefiting from Internet use (Lee & Kuo,
2002). They explained that this might be due to some characteristics of newspapers and radio
that make them more resistant to displacement. Althaus and Tewksbury (2000) and Bromley and
Bowles (1995) also suggested that people would use online news to supplement, not replace,
their core news consumption. People often go online to follow up on news they originally
received from traditional media (Tewksbury, 2002). Rather, these people read online news to fill
the gaps in their exposure to other media or, more likely, to monitor ongoing events (e.g., stock
prices or sporting events) or breaking news (Tewksbury, 2002).
Similarly, Robinson and associates (1997) found evidence of a symbiotic or
complementary relationship between Computer Mediated Communication (CMC) of the Internet
and print media, where each seems to reinforce the use of the other. Consistent with this


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