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A general process model of the gender-linked language effect: Antecedents for and consequences of language used by men and women

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Abstract:

The Gender-Linked Language Effect has been found with great consistency over the past two decades across a wide variety of contexts. Observers reading transcripts of natural communication rate women (whom they can not identify as such) higher on Socio-Intellectual Status (SIS) and Aesthetic Quality (AQ), and men higher on Dynamism (D). But what is the causal chain that leads to this remarkably constant result? The present paper presents a general process model to explain the effect. Constructs of the model include: the speakerís situational inputs, perception of context, gender-linked language schemata and stereotypes, and gender-linked language behaviors, as well as the hearerís perception of context, gender-linked language schemata and stereotypes, judgments of SIS, AQ, and D, and behaviors toward the speaker. A total of 48 theorems are derived from the model.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

languag (255), gender (237), speaker (165), link (142), hearer (139), gender-link (121), schemata (93), stereotyp (88), context (81), model (80), general (79), may (75), process (75), behavior (72), percept (71), use (65), situat (63), communic (62), effect (59), j (52), judgment (48),

Author's Keywords:

gender, language, gender-linked language effect, theory construction, perception, schema
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Name: International Communication Association
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MLA Citation:

Mulac, Anthony., Bradac, James. and Palomares, Nicholas. "A general process model of the gender-linked language effect: Antecedents for and consequences of language used by men and women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 <Not Available>. 2009-05-26 <http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111887_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mulac, A. , Bradac, J. J. and Palomares, N. A. , 2003-05-27 "A general process model of the gender-linked language effect: Antecedents for and consequences of language used by men and women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA Online <.PDF>. 2009-05-26 from http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p111887_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Gender-Linked Language Effect has been found with great consistency over the past two decades across a wide variety of contexts. Observers reading transcripts of natural communication rate women (whom they can not identify as such) higher on Socio-Intellectual Status (SIS) and Aesthetic Quality (AQ), and men higher on Dynamism (D). But what is the causal chain that leads to this remarkably constant result? The present paper presents a general process model to explain the effect. Constructs of the model include: the speakerís situational inputs, perception of context, gender-linked language schemata and stereotypes, and gender-linked language behaviors, as well as the hearerís perception of context, gender-linked language schemata and stereotypes, judgments of SIS, AQ, and D, and behaviors toward the speaker. A total of 48 theorems are derived from the model.

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Document Type: .PDF
Page count: 42
Word count: 11215
Text sample:
General Process Model of the GLLE A general process model of the gender-linked language effect: Antecedents for and consequences of language used by men and women Abstract The Gender-Linked Language Effect has been found with great consistency over the past two decades across a wide variety of contexts. Observers reading transcripts of natural communication rate women (whom they can not identify as such) higher on Socio-Intellectual Status (SIS) and Aesthetic Quality (AQ) and men higher on Dynamism (D). But
Perception of Inputs (SI1 2) Schemata and Behaviors of Context (PCs) Stereotypes (GLSs) Speaker (GLBs) Hearer’s Gender- Hearer Behaviors Hearer Judgments Linked Language toward Speaker of SIS AQ and D Schemata and Hearer Perception (Bh) (Jh) of Context (PCh) Stereotypes (GLSh) +


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