All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Gender Differences in the Communication Values of Mature Adults
Unformatted Document Text:  Gender Differences in Communication Values 3 women place higher value on affective than instrumental skills. This pattern of findings is consistent across studies that have focused on communication values in same-sex friendships of varying intimacy (Burleson et al., 1996, Study 1; Griffiths & Burleson, 1995; Hollingsworth & Powers, 2002; Samter & Burleson, 1998; Westmyer & Myers, 1996), cross-sex friendships (Griffiths & Burleson, 1995), and cross-sex romantic relationships (Burleson et al., 1996, Study 2). This work has been a strong challenge to the different cultures perspective (see Burleson, 1997; Kunkel & Burleson, 1998). Yet, it is not without its shortcomings. In her 1997 defense of the different cultures perspective, Wood criticized Burleson et al.’s (1996) research (and that of other scholars) for its reliance on college student samples. As Wood suggests, gender differences among college students may be considerably smaller than those in the broader population for several reasons. First, older individuals experienced childhood socialization at a time when gender norms were less flexible. Second, greater age makes one more likely to have inhabited a highly gendered occupational or familial role (e.g., motherhood). And, third, by virtue of their education college students are more likely to have been exposed to an ideology of androgyny and gender equality. Wood also criticized Burleson et al.’s work for adopting a biological sex as a proxy measure of gender. She recommended that researchers examine the influence of psychological gender (i.e., masculinity and femininity) because these predictors may reveal stronger evidence of gender-based cultures. Although several studies of gender differences in communication values have taken place since the research by Burleson et al. (Hollingsworth & Powers, 2002; Samter & Burleson, 1998; Westmyer & Myers, 1996), none have addressed Wood’s criticisms. Accordingly the current research was designed to examine gender differences in the communication values of mature adults and to examine the influence of psychological gender on these values. Because Wood’s

Authors: MacGeorge, Erina., Feng, Bo. and Butler, Ginger.
first   previous   Page 3 of 17   next   last



background image
Gender Differences in Communication Values 3
women place higher value on affective than instrumental skills. This pattern of findings is
consistent across studies that have focused on communication values in same-sex friendships of
varying intimacy (Burleson et al., 1996, Study 1; Griffiths & Burleson, 1995; Hollingsworth &
Powers, 2002; Samter & Burleson, 1998; Westmyer & Myers, 1996), cross-sex friendships
(Griffiths & Burleson, 1995), and cross-sex romantic relationships (Burleson et al., 1996, Study
2). This work has been a strong challenge to the different cultures perspective (see Burleson,
1997; Kunkel & Burleson, 1998). Yet, it is not without its shortcomings.
In her 1997 defense of the different cultures perspective, Wood criticized Burleson et
al.’s (1996) research (and that of other scholars) for its reliance on college student samples. As
Wood suggests, gender differences among college students may be considerably smaller than
those in the broader population for several reasons. First, older individuals experienced
childhood socialization at a time when gender norms were less flexible. Second, greater age
makes one more likely to have inhabited a highly gendered occupational or familial role (e.g.,
motherhood). And, third, by virtue of their education college students are more likely to have
been exposed to an ideology of androgyny and gender equality. Wood also criticized Burleson et
al.’s work for adopting a biological sex as a proxy measure of gender. She recommended that
researchers examine the influence of psychological gender (i.e., masculinity and femininity)
because these predictors may reveal stronger evidence of gender-based cultures.
Although several studies of gender differences in communication values have taken place
since the research by Burleson et al. (Hollingsworth & Powers, 2002; Samter & Burleson, 1998;
Westmyer & Myers, 1996), none have addressed Wood’s criticisms. Accordingly the current
research was designed to examine gender differences in the communication values of mature
adults and to examine the influence of psychological gender on these values. Because Wood’s


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 17   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.