All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A general process model of the gender-linked language effect: Antecedents for and consequences of language used by men and women
Unformatted Document Text:  General Process Model of the GLLE 15 alternative hypothesis is that in accommodation situations involving unacquainted persons men quickly copy the many language features performed by specific female partners, and vice versa for women. This hypothesis would demand a very powerful information-processing device indeed. There is a suggestive study by Niederhoffer & Pennebaker (2002) that lends some credence to the alternative hypothesis. Briefly, these researchers found that interactants matched each other (mutual accommodation) on several linguistic dimensions simultaneously on a turn- by-turn basis. The cognitive mechanism that allows such rapid and complex linguistic response matching has not been specified at this point. However, there is evidence that even in non- accommodative situations, e.g., unilateral criticism-giving, men may use female language features and women may use male features as a result of specific role requirements and normative constraints, which supports the idea of cross-gender learning of language schemata (Mulac et al., 2000). Frequent exposure to opposite-sex speakers increasingly from early adolescence may supplement the powerful language socialization occurring in same-sex peer groups during early childhood as described by Maltz and Borker (1982). Gender-linked language behaviors: GLB s The schemata and occasionally the stereotypes give rise to language performance. We think of gender-linked language as a multivariate phenomenon, as a cluster of masculine or feminine linguistic features the boundaries of which are fuzzy and the membership of which varies as a function of speaker idiosyncrasies and occasion. These clusters are “fuzzy sets” with prototypical and peripheral constituents. It is not the case that any particular language feature is invariably associated with male or female speakers. Rather, women use some features more frequently than men do, whereas men use others more frequently. However, some features have been associated with either male or female speakers in several studies, and these are candidates

Authors: Mulac, Anthony., Bradac, James. and Palomares, Nicholas.
first   previous   Page 16 of 42   next   last



background image
General Process Model of the GLLE
15
alternative hypothesis is that in accommodation situations involving unacquainted persons men
quickly copy the many language features performed by specific female partners, and vice versa
for women. This hypothesis would demand a very powerful information-processing device
indeed. There is a suggestive study by Niederhoffer & Pennebaker (2002) that lends some
credence to the alternative hypothesis. Briefly, these researchers found that interactants matched
each other (mutual accommodation) on several linguistic dimensions simultaneously on a turn-
by-turn basis. The cognitive mechanism that allows such rapid and complex linguistic response
matching has not been specified at this point. However, there is evidence that even in non-
accommodative situations, e.g., unilateral criticism-giving, men may use female language
features and women may use male features as a result of specific role requirements and
normative constraints, which supports the idea of cross-gender learning of language schemata
(Mulac et al., 2000). Frequent exposure to opposite-sex speakers increasingly from early
adolescence may supplement the powerful language socialization occurring in same-sex peer
groups during early childhood as described by Maltz and Borker (1982).
Gender-linked language behaviors: GLB
s
The schemata and occasionally the stereotypes give rise to language performance. We
think of gender-linked language as a multivariate phenomenon, as a cluster of masculine or
feminine linguistic features the boundaries of which are fuzzy and the membership of which
varies as a function of speaker idiosyncrasies and occasion. These clusters are “fuzzy sets” with
prototypical and peripheral constituents. It is not the case that any particular language feature is
invariably associated with male or female speakers. Rather, women use some features more
frequently than men do, whereas men use others more frequently. However, some features have
been associated with either male or female speakers in several studies, and these are candidates


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 16 of 42   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.