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A general process model of the gender-linked language effect: Antecedents for and consequences of language used by men and women
Unformatted Document Text:  General Process Model of the GLLE 21 informative than is the more complex hypothesis that the causal link between inputs and language behavior is mediated by schemata and stereotypes; so syllogistic logic is not very useful in this case. This seems to be the case for the other SI 2 Æ theorems as well (T2, 3, 5, and 6) and for GLS h Æ B h (T21) (hearer schemata are causally linked to hearer behavior toward speaker; again the more complex hypothesis GLS h Æ J h Æ B h is more interesting). More interesting also is the general hypothesis that B h Æ J h (T27), which suggests that a hearer’s behavior toward a speaker may be causally linked to the hearer’s subsequent judgments of SIS, AQ, and D; the hearer’s behavior may generate his or her own judgments. Thus, for example, if the hearer uses highly dynamic language, this may elevate his judgments of speaker dynamism via a perceptual assimilation effect (+B h Æ +J h ). Similarly, the idea that a hearer’s behavior may constitute a causal factor in the production of speaker schemata and stereotypes is suggestive (B h Æ GLS s ; T23) as is the notion that a hearer’s behavior may be linked to a speaker’s use of gender-linked language (B h Æ GLB s ; T24), perhaps reciprocally (+B h Æ +GLB s , a form of mutual accommodation; Mulac et al., 1988), and the idea that this behavior may be linked to the hearer’s own language schemata and stereotypes (B h Æ GLS h ; T26), perhaps reinforcing them, (+B h Æ +GLS h ). If B h Æ PC h (T25), then a hearer’s behavior toward a speaker can affect the hearer’s perception of the communication context; a more general version of this notion is that one’s perceptions of (attitudes toward, beliefs about) social objects can be affected by one’s own behavior toward these objects, as in the case of counter-attitudinal advocacy, and this general hypothesis has been supported frequently in specific contexts (Apsler, 1976; Miller & Wozniak, 2001). If B h Æ PC s (T22), then a hearer’s behavior toward a speaker can affect a speaker’s perception of context, as we speculated earlier (Giles & Hewstone, 1982). Thus, for example, a

Authors: Mulac, Anthony., Bradac, James. and Palomares, Nicholas.
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background image
General Process Model of the GLLE
21
informative than is the more complex hypothesis that the causal link between inputs and
language behavior is mediated by schemata and stereotypes; so syllogistic logic is not very
useful in this case. This seems to be the case for the other SI
2
Æ theorems as well (T2, 3, 5, and
6) and for GLS
h
Æ B
h
(T21) (hearer schemata are causally linked to hearer behavior toward
speaker; again the more complex hypothesis GLS
h
Æ J
h
Æ B
h
is more interesting).
More interesting also is the general hypothesis that B
h
Æ J
h
(T27), which suggests that a
hearer’s behavior toward a speaker may be causally linked to the hearer’s subsequent judgments
of SIS, AQ, and D; the hearer’s behavior may generate his or her own judgments. Thus, for
example, if the hearer uses highly dynamic language, this may elevate his judgments of speaker
dynamism via a perceptual assimilation effect (+B
h
Æ +J
h
). Similarly, the idea that a hearer’s
behavior may constitute a causal factor in the production of speaker schemata and stereotypes is
suggestive (B
h
Æ GLS
s
; T23) as is the notion that a hearer’s behavior may be linked to a
speaker’s use of gender-linked language (B
h
Æ GLB
s
; T24), perhaps reciprocally
(+B
h
Æ +GLB
s
, a form of mutual accommodation; Mulac et al., 1988), and the idea that this
behavior may be linked to the hearer’s own language schemata and stereotypes (B
h
Æ GLS
h
;
T26), perhaps reinforcing them, (+B
h
Æ +GLS
h
).
If B
h
Æ PC
h
(T25), then a hearer’s behavior toward a speaker can affect the hearer’s
perception of the communication context; a more general version of this notion is that one’s
perceptions of (attitudes toward, beliefs about) social objects can be affected by one’s own
behavior toward these objects, as in the case of counter-attitudinal advocacy, and this general
hypothesis has been supported frequently in specific contexts (Apsler, 1976; Miller & Wozniak,
2001). If B
h
Æ PC
s
(T22), then a hearer’s behavior toward a speaker can affect a speaker’s
perception of context, as we speculated earlier (Giles & Hewstone, 1982). Thus, for example, a


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