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Depression Promotion in Consumer Advocacy: Sick Brains, Scrutinized Behavior, and Self-Healing
Unformatted Document Text:  26 Others debate the types of activities and discourse that might indeed constitute subversion. Some members charge that using terms such as “crazies” undermines the Coalition’s efforts, while others defend the usefulness of usurping and reframing psychiatric terms, and create new lists of diagnoses for diagnosticians. One such debate ended with a member contending that human beings need to mutate out of the State where thoughts are fixed. Discursive subversion is alive, albeit highly contested, at the discussion boards. Mind freedom, then, according to the Coalition, is self-determination. The group avoids defining “normal”, and critiques the biopsychiatric paradigm for doing so. A few Dendron articles critique the bad science of Prozac research and launch concerns that brain research might one day determine normal behavior. Clearly, only some of the Coalition’s members discuss the differences between acts of power- taking and resistive acts that instead reinscribe psychiatric power. Still, the group provides a forum to argue these positions, offering consumers stepping stones to power-taking, and a space where talk is subversive rather than therapeutic. Remarkably, Support Coalition critiques the consumer-capitalist therapeutic model evident in State mental health policy, the pharmaceutical industry, colluding NGO’s and biopsychiatry. By offering consumers campaign products, the Coalition illustrates that knowledge is delivered through commodity exchange. The group then demonstrates power-taking by subverting the paradigm of mental health campaigns. Wisely, the discourse refrains from dictating how subversion is undertaken, illustrating that self-determined actions are the primary route to both escaping and making power. Support Coalition however, is unique, and not widely accessible to the mainstream. Consumer groups, such as Prozac Survivors, that object to the broad-spectrum biopsychiatric depression model often encourage a more commonplace resistance that sets up consumers to defend themselves against the expansive power of the standard depression script. 31 . As argued, most mental health advocacy groups, and those that are best known culturally, promote increased microsocial management by directing consumers to 31 Prozac Survivors is a consumer group that contends Prozac has serious side effects that are not listed in package information, and causes individuals to become violent or suicidal. The group’s WebSite ( http://www.pssg.org/ ) contains, among other things, published research confirming that the drug causes dangerous side effects, writings by scholars citing the dangers of Prozac, as well as details of numerous legal suits charging Prozac-producer Eli Lilly of knowingly promoting the drug, despite knowledge of its dangerous side effects. Additionally, there are links to consumer activist groups, support groups and legal assistance, enabling consumers to take various forms of action against the drug and/or Eli Lilly.

Authors: Gardner, Paula.
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26
Others debate the types of activities and discourse that might indeed constitute subversion. Some members
charge that using terms such as “crazies” undermines the Coalition’s efforts, while others defend the
usefulness of usurping and reframing psychiatric terms, and create new lists of diagnoses for diagnosticians.
One such debate ended with a member contending that human beings need to mutate out of the State where
thoughts are fixed. Discursive subversion is alive, albeit highly contested, at the discussion boards.
Mind freedom, then, according to the Coalition, is self-determination. The group avoids defining
“normal”, and critiques the biopsychiatric paradigm for doing so. A few Dendron articles critique the bad
science of Prozac research and launch concerns that brain research might one day determine normal
behavior. Clearly, only some of the Coalition’s members discuss the differences between acts of power-
taking and resistive acts that instead reinscribe psychiatric power. Still, the group provides a forum to argue
these positions, offering consumers stepping stones to power-taking, and a space where talk is subversive
rather than therapeutic. Remarkably, Support Coalition critiques the consumer-capitalist therapeutic model
evident in State mental health policy, the pharmaceutical industry, colluding NGO’s and biopsychiatry. By
offering consumers campaign products, the Coalition illustrates that knowledge is delivered through
commodity exchange. The group then demonstrates power-taking by subverting the paradigm of mental
health campaigns. Wisely, the discourse refrains from dictating how subversion is undertaken, illustrating
that self-determined actions are the primary route to both escaping and making power.
Support Coalition however, is unique, and not widely accessible to the mainstream. Consumer
groups, such as Prozac Survivors, that object to the broad-spectrum biopsychiatric depression model often
encourage a more commonplace resistance that sets up consumers to defend themselves against the
expansive power of the standard depression script.
31
. As argued, most mental health advocacy groups, and
those that are best known culturally, promote increased microsocial management by directing consumers to
31
Prozac Survivors is a consumer group that contends Prozac has serious side effects that are not listed in
package information, and causes individuals to become violent or suicidal. The group’s WebSite
(
http://www.pssg.org/
) contains, among other things, published research confirming that the drug causes
dangerous side effects, writings by scholars citing the dangers of Prozac, as well as details of numerous
legal suits charging Prozac-producer Eli Lilly of knowingly promoting the drug, despite knowledge of its
dangerous side effects. Additionally, there are links to consumer activist groups, support groups and legal
assistance, enabling consumers to take various forms of action against the drug and/or Eli Lilly.


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