All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Click here, kids! Advertising practices on popular children's Web sites
Unformatted Document Text:  Advertising on Children’s Web Sites 11 RQ5: Does the advertisement page have a link to its privacy policy? RQ6: Does the advertisement page collect any personal information? Lastly, it is important to examine if there is any relationship between the host Web sites and the ads they feature on their Web: RQ7: How does the presence of privacy link on a host Web site interact with features of the ads on its site? RQ8: How does the host Web sites’ collection of personal information interact with features of the ads on its site? Method Sampling The current sample was obtained from two sources. Most of the Web sites included in this sample were from the FTC’s original sample pool (FTC, 2002a). The rest of the sample was from Nielsen//NetRatings’ most popular children’s Web sites list. The FTC’s sample consisted of 144 Web sites for children. From Nielsen//NetRatings, the FTC purchased a list of all commercial Web sites (.com) (11,154), with exception of pornography sites, that had been visited by at least one child (2-12) during the month of June 2000. Two criteria were used to determine if the sites were primarily targeting children. First, only the Web sites with composition index 1 equal or greater than 100 were included in the sample. Second, only the Web sites which were visited by 5,000 children or more based on national projected audience were included in the sample. Out of the initial 11,154 Web sites, 1,253 fitted both criteria. However, only 1 The composition index is based on the ratio of the composition percentage with the percentage of the Internet population made up of 2 to 12-year-olds. The data suggested that children made up of 8.5% of the Internet population. If a Web site’s composition of children equals to the children’s composition percentage of the whole Internet population, then the Web site has a composition index number of 100.

Authors: Cai, Xiaomei. and Markiewicz, Kristin.
first   previous   Page 11 of 36   next   last



background image
Advertising on Children’s Web Sites 11
RQ5: Does the advertisement page have a link to its privacy policy?
RQ6: Does the advertisement page collect any personal information?
Lastly, it is important to examine if there is any relationship between the host
Web sites and the ads they feature on their Web:
RQ7: How does the presence of privacy link on a host Web site interact with
features of the ads on its site?
RQ8: How does the host Web sites’ collection of personal information interact
with features of the ads on its site?
Method
Sampling
The current sample was obtained from two sources. Most of the Web sites
included in this sample were from the FTC’s original sample pool (FTC, 2002a). The rest
of the sample was from Nielsen//NetRatings’ most popular children’s Web sites list.
The FTC’s sample consisted of 144 Web sites for children. From
Nielsen//NetRatings, the FTC purchased a list of all commercial Web sites (.com)
(11,154), with exception of pornography sites, that had been visited by at least one child
(2-12) during the month of June 2000. Two criteria were used to determine if the sites
were primarily targeting children. First, only the Web sites with composition index
1
equal
or greater than 100 were included in the sample. Second, only the Web sites which were
visited by 5,000 children or more based on national projected audience were included in
the sample. Out of the initial 11,154 Web sites, 1,253 fitted both criteria. However, only
1
The composition index is based on the ratio of the composition percentage with the percentage of the
Internet population made up of 2 to 12-year-olds. The data suggested that children made up of 8.5% of the
Internet population. If a Web site’s composition of children equals to the children’s composition percentage
of the whole Internet population, then the Web site has a composition index number of 100.


Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 11 of 36   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.