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Click here, kids! Advertising practices on popular children's Web sites
Unformatted Document Text:  Advertising on Children’s Web Sites 21 sites did collect personal information aimed at the general public, another 38 percent of these ads (N=229) directed at children, and 12 percent of them (N=73) aimed at adults ( 2 (1, N=667)=10.55, df=1, p<.01). The ads whose host sites collected personal information were also more likely to collect personal information on their ad pages. Ninety-five percent of ads (N=566) whose host Web sites collected personal information did the same thing on their own ad pages. Sixty-four percent of those ads (N=43) whose host sites did not collect personal information collected personal information ( 2 (1, N=666)=70.75, df=1, p<.001). Using enticement was employed by the majority of ads (91%). While enticements were featured in 91 percent of the ads (N=572) whose host sites collected personal information, eighty-four percent of the ads (N=58) whose host sites did not collect personal information used enticements ( 2 (1, N=695)=3.92, df=1, p=.048). Discussion This study examined the nature of advertisements on popular children’s Web sites. A majority of children’s Web sites had ads. On average, each Web site hosted five ads. It was highly likely that each ad appeared more than once on a Web site. However, most of these ads were not identified as ads on the Web sites and when a child clicked on an ad, a bridge window or page seldom appeared to warn the child that he or she was leaving the original children’s Web site. The vast majority of the ads used certain type of enticement to attract children’s attention, and half of them used prompt words such as “enter here” and “click here.” Eighty-four percent of the Web sites (N=111) examined featured a link on the homepage to their privacy policy. But more than half of these links (59%, N=67) were

Authors: Cai, Xiaomei. and Markiewicz, Kristin.
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Advertising on Children’s Web Sites 21
sites did collect personal information aimed at the general public, another 38 percent of
these ads (N=229) directed at children, and 12 percent of them (N=73) aimed at adults
(
2
(1, N=667)=10.55, df=1, p<.01).
The ads whose host sites collected personal information were also more likely to
collect personal information on their ad pages. Ninety-five percent of ads (N=566) whose
host Web sites collected personal information did the same thing on their own ad pages.
Sixty-four percent of those ads (N=43) whose host sites did not collect personal
information collected personal information (
2
(1, N=666)=70.75, df=1, p<.001).
Using enticement was employed by the majority of ads (91%). While enticements
were featured in 91 percent of the ads (N=572) whose host sites collected personal
information, eighty-four percent of the ads (N=58) whose host sites did not collect
personal information used enticements (
2
(1, N=695)=3.92, df=1, p=.048).
Discussion
This study examined the nature of advertisements on popular children’s Web
sites. A majority of children’s Web sites had ads. On average, each Web site hosted five
ads. It was highly likely that each ad appeared more than once on a Web site. However,
most of these ads were not identified as ads on the Web sites and when a child clicked on
an ad, a bridge window or page seldom appeared to warn the child that he or she was
leaving the original children’s Web site. The vast majority of the ads used certain type of
enticement to attract children’s attention, and half of them used prompt words such as
“enter here” and “click here.”
Eighty-four percent of the Web sites (N=111) examined featured a link on the
homepage to their privacy policy. But more than half of these links (59%, N=67) were


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