All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

Host Communication Competence and Psychological Health: A Study of Cross-cultural Adaptation of Korean Expatriate Employees in the United States*
Unformatted Document Text:  Cross-cultural Adaptation 3 Introduction Today the business environment around the world is increasingly more global. Many companies are dispatching their employees, particularly managerial and professional employees, on overseas assignments to implement their global strategies and to control and coordinate their subsidiaries (Black, Gregersen, & Mendenhall, 1992). According to the Conference Board survey report (1992), half of 130 Multinational Companies had more than 50 high level managers currently on international assignments, and 25% of the organizations had between 200 to 2,000 managers on international assignments. In addition, the survey of 177 multinational companies indicated that the number of expatriate assignments had increased, and 63% of this sample believe that this growth would continue in the future (Windham International, 1998). The expatriate becomes the classic example of a "sojourner,” since multinational organizations move around the world continuously and the organizations become more deeply integrated into the global economy. The expatriate leaves his home country with the intent of an eventual return. The expatriate immerses himself in a new cultural environment that may be unfamiliar and unpredictable in almost every dimension imaginable. Furthermore, expatriate executives have to perform in an unfamiliar work context and they must deal with a different way of life than in their own country and experience profound personal transformation. While multinational organizations recognize the significant position of expatriates and their performance in international assignment, it has been reported that fearing identity loss and unable to cope with a myriad of new stressors, nearly 40 percent of American expatriates return early (Kealey, 1996). This retention failure of the expatriate in overseas assignment has incurred serious costs to the company and to the expatriate himself. Recent studies show that the early termination of just one expatriate costs U.S. firms as much as $1 million (Shannonhouse, 1996). In addition, non-financial costs of failure include damaged company reputation, lost business opportunities and lost market or competitive share

Authors: Kim, II, Yang-Soo.
first   previous   Page 3 of 32   next   last



background image
Cross-cultural Adaptation 3
Introduction
Today the business environment around the world is increasingly more global. Many companies
are dispatching their employees, particularly managerial and professional employees, on overseas
assignments to implement their global strategies and to control and coordinate their subsidiaries (Black,
Gregersen, & Mendenhall, 1992).
According to the Conference Board survey report (1992), half of 130 Multinational Companies
had more than 50 high level managers currently on international assignments, and 25% of the
organizations had between 200 to 2,000 managers on international assignments. In addition, the survey
of 177 multinational companies indicated that the number of expatriate assignments had increased, and
63% of this sample believe that this growth would continue in the future (Windham International, 1998).
The expatriate becomes the classic example of a "sojourner,” since multinational organizations
move around the world continuously and the organizations become more deeply integrated into the global
economy. The expatriate leaves his home country with the intent of an eventual return. The expatriate
immerses himself in a new cultural environment that may be unfamiliar and unpredictable in almost
every dimension imaginable. Furthermore, expatriate executives have to perform in an unfamiliar work
context and they must deal with a different way of life than in their own country and experience profound
personal transformation.
While multinational organizations recognize the significant position of expatriates and their
performance in international assignment, it has been reported that fearing identity loss and unable to cope
with a myriad of new stressors, nearly 40 percent of American expatriates return early (Kealey, 1996).
This retention failure of the expatriate in overseas assignment has incurred serious costs to the company
and to the expatriate himself. Recent studies show that the early termination of just one expatriate costs
U.S. firms as much as $1 million (Shannonhouse, 1996). In addition, non-financial costs of failure
include damaged company reputation, lost business opportunities and lost market or competitive share


Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 32   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.