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Black and white, male and female: Racial and Gender Differences in Adolescents' TV Diets
Unformatted Document Text:  Black and White 9 cards so parental consent forms and the questionnaires could be mailed to their homes. A $1 bill and a pen with the study logo on it were attached to each media survey. In addition, respondents had the opportunity to win mall gift certificates and tickets to area university basketball games. A total of 5,398 students were reached during the school recruitment effort. A small proportion of these students (7%) did not provide useable contact information, so approximately 5,000 students were sent media survey packets. Based on the average monthly attendance for students across all participating schools (5,886), the questionnaire successfully reached 85% of the currently enrolled students. Initial non-responders were sent follow-up postcards and a second set of materials to maximize response rates. By the end of the four-month survey administration period, 3,262 completed surveys (with parent consent forms) were returned, for a final response rate of 65%. This is within range or exceeds most survey research conducted with adolescents. Participant demographics were generally representative of the entire student body, although White females were slightly over represented in the sample compared to the school population (26% vs. 22%), and Black males were slightly underrepresented (18% vs. 22%). The income of the sample was somewhat higher than the total student body: 28% of the sample reported receiving free or reduced price breakfast or lunch, while 34% of the total school enrollment did. Measures The questionnaire was a 36-page booklet that included a number of questions about adolescents’ current use of six different kinds of media (television, music, movies, newspapers, magazines and the Internet). We focused only on the following variables in these analyses: Gender Respondents self-reported whether they were a “Girl” or “Guy.” If this question was left blank, earlier self-reports from the school recruitment information were used to determine gender.

Authors: Brown, Jane. and Pardun, Carol J.
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background image
Black and White
9
cards so parental consent forms and the questionnaires could be mailed to their homes. A $1 bill
and a pen with the study logo on it were attached to each media survey. In addition, respondents
had the opportunity to win mall gift certificates and tickets to area university basketball games.
A total of 5,398 students were reached during the school recruitment effort. A small
proportion of these students (7%) did not provide useable contact information, so approximately
5,000 students were sent media survey packets. Based on the average monthly attendance for
students across all participating schools (5,886), the questionnaire successfully reached 85% of
the currently enrolled students. Initial non-responders were sent follow-up postcards and a second
set of materials to maximize response rates. By the end of the four-month survey administration
period, 3,262 completed surveys (with parent consent forms) were returned, for a final response
rate of 65%. This is within range or exceeds most survey research conducted with adolescents.
Participant demographics were generally representative of the entire student body,
although White females were slightly over represented in the sample compared to the school
population (26% vs. 22%), and Black males were slightly underrepresented (18% vs. 22%). The
income of the sample was somewhat higher than the total student body: 28% of the sample
reported receiving free or reduced price breakfast or lunch, while 34% of the total school
enrollment did.
Measures
The questionnaire was a 36-page booklet that included a number of questions about
adolescents’ current use of six different kinds of media (television, music, movies, newspapers,
magazines and the Internet). We focused only on the following variables in these analyses:
Gender
Respondents self-reported whether they were a “Girl” or “Guy.” If this question was left
blank, earlier self-reports from the school recruitment information were used to determine gender.


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