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A Communicative Approach to Road Rage: Accounts of Driving and Retaliation
Unformatted Document Text:  Road Rage 10 b. Do participants accept responsibility, if only in part, for their road rage behavior? Finally, as persons involved in road rage episodes have the opportunity to reflect on the incident, there could be affirmations or changes in how participants understand their own road rage behaviors. Issues that participants did not (or could not) consider while in the heat of road rage might come to the fore in later ruminations. The conclusions drawn from such reflections should be helpful to our understanding of the road rage phenomenon. Consequently, our final research question is as follows: RQ3: What reflections on the incident do participants report? Method Sample Participants were upper division communication students at a large Southwestern university. Seventy-four students completed and returned the questionnaires. Of those received, 69 were usable. The five that were discarded did not offer examples of road rage. The sample included 26 men (37.7%) and 40 women (58.0%) with three not reporting their sex. Age of the participants ranged from 19 to 29 (M=22.93, Sd=2.17). Fifty-five (79.7%) of the participants were in their senior year of college, eight (11.6%) were juniors, one (1.4%) was a sophomore, and one (1.4%) was a freshman, with four (5.8%) participants not reporting student status. Only five (7.2%) participants reported that alcohol was involved in the incident. None reported any drugs were used immediately prior to or at the time of the incident. Instrumentation An open-ended survey was distributed to students who had experienced a road rage incident in the past year (reported in months, M=6.35, Sd=11.71). Students were offered extra credit for their participation. If they had not experienced road rage within the previous year, two alternative research opportunities for extra credit were provided. Respondents were first asked to “Take a few moments now and recall the event. Imagine what happened.” Then, background information, such as age, sex, and year in school, were assessed. This section also asked participants to respond to specific questions that included how long ago the incident occurred, the day of the week, destination, who was driving during the incident, was anyone else in the car, were any drugs or alcohol involved, and any additional background information that might be

Authors: Canary, Daniel., Mikkelson, Alan., Switzer, Frank. and Bailey, Carrie.
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Road Rage 10
b. Do participants accept responsibility, if only in part, for their road rage behavior?
Finally, as persons involved in road rage episodes have the opportunity to reflect on the incident,
there could be affirmations or changes in how participants understand their own road rage behaviors. Issues
that participants did not (or could not) consider while in the heat of road rage might come to the fore in later
ruminations. The conclusions drawn from such reflections should be helpful to our understanding of the
road rage phenomenon. Consequently, our final research question is as follows:
RQ3: What reflections on the incident do participants report?
Method
Sample
Participants were upper division communication students at a large Southwestern university.
Seventy-four students completed and returned the questionnaires. Of those received, 69 were usable. The
five that were discarded did not offer examples of road rage. The sample included 26 men (37.7%) and 40
women (58.0%) with three not reporting their sex. Age of the participants ranged from 19 to 29 (M=22.93,
Sd=2.17). Fifty-five (79.7%) of the participants were in their senior year of college, eight (11.6%) were
juniors, one (1.4%) was a sophomore, and one (1.4%) was a freshman, with four (5.8%) participants not
reporting student status. Only five (7.2%) participants reported that alcohol was involved in the incident.
None reported any drugs were used immediately prior to or at the time of the incident.
Instrumentation
An open-ended survey was distributed to students who had experienced a road rage incident in the
past year (reported in months, M=6.35, Sd=11.71). Students were offered extra credit for their participation.
If they had not experienced road rage within the previous year, two alternative research opportunities for
extra credit were provided. Respondents were first asked to “Take a few moments now and recall the event.
Imagine what happened.” Then, background information, such as age, sex, and year in school, were
assessed. This section also asked participants to respond to specific questions that included how long ago
the incident occurred, the day of the week, destination, who was driving during the incident, was anyone
else in the car, were any drugs or alcohol involved, and any additional background information that might be


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