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A Communicative Approach to Road Rage: Accounts of Driving and Retaliation
Unformatted Document Text:  Road Rage 14 categorization, whereby words used by participants were matched to the coding scheme. First, Irritation also included annoyance, aggravation, and discomfort. Second, Exasperation also included frustration. Third, Rage included anger, fury, hate, hostility, and such phrases as “pissed off” or “that guy ticked me off.” Fourth, Disgust included revulsion, contempt, and upset. The first four categories constitute different forms and types of anger. The fifth category was that of Surprise, and included shock, disbelief, confusion, and astonishment. Horror included fear, fright, alarm, and “shaking/trembling.” Nervousness contained items of apprehension, anxiety, and statements such as, “I was worried.” Both horror and nervousness were forms of a larger category of fear. Sadness/Shame also included remorse, sorrow and regret. Finally, Relief was displayed by “feeling better” or “calming down.” Frequencies for emotions are reported in Table 2. ________________ Insert Table 2 here _______________ Attributions Attributions were divided into three primary categories: (1) attributions about the other driver; (2) attributions made about the driver of the car in which they were the passenger (applicable only if the participant was the passenger and not the driver); (3) self attributions (applicable only if the participant was the driver). Attributions were independently rated by the three coders on a 7-point scale based on Bradbury and Fincham’s (1990) dimensions of responsibility, locus (internal or external), stability, globablity, intent and blameworthiness. Assessments were based on the language used to make the attribution. For example, “jerk” was coded less negatively than “asshole.” After these six items were rated, the coder rated whether or not the attributions were fair. Attributions were not specifically requested, so attributions were not consistently recorded by the participants, especially the attributions made by the passenger and the self attributions made by the driver. However, these attributions are helpful in that they give a sense of what participants are thinking during and after partaking in a road rage incident. Finally, two questions determined, first, if causes were explicitly offered by the participant for the event or for their own actions, and second, if any lessons were learned by the participant. Each item was coded as yes or no.

Authors: Canary, Daniel., Mikkelson, Alan., Switzer, Frank. and Bailey, Carrie.
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Road Rage 14
categorization, whereby words used by participants were matched to the coding scheme. First, Irritation
also included annoyance, aggravation, and discomfort. Second, Exasperation also included frustration.
Third, Rage included anger, fury, hate, hostility, and such phrases as “pissed off” or “that guy ticked me
off.” Fourth, Disgust included revulsion, contempt, and upset. The first four categories constitute different
forms and types of anger. The fifth category was that of Surprise, and included shock, disbelief, confusion,
and astonishment. Horror included fear, fright, alarm, and “shaking/trembling.” Nervousness contained
items of apprehension, anxiety, and statements such as, “I was worried.” Both horror and nervousness were
forms of a larger category of fear. Sadness/Shame also included remorse, sorrow and regret. Finally, Relief
was displayed by “feeling better” or “calming down.” Frequencies for emotions are reported in Table 2.
________________
Insert Table 2 here
_______________
Attributions
Attributions were divided into three primary categories: (1) attributions about the other driver; (2)
attributions made about the driver of the car in which they were the passenger (applicable only if the
participant was the passenger and not the driver); (3) self attributions (applicable only if the participant was
the driver). Attributions were independently rated by the three coders on a 7-point scale based on Bradbury
and Fincham’s (1990) dimensions of responsibility, locus (internal or external), stability, globablity, intent
and blameworthiness. Assessments were based on the language used to make the attribution. For example,
“jerk” was coded less negatively than “asshole.” After these six items were rated, the coder rated whether or
not the attributions were fair. Attributions were not specifically requested, so attributions were not
consistently recorded by the participants, especially the attributions made by the passenger and the self
attributions made by the driver. However, these attributions are helpful in that they give a sense of what
participants are thinking during and after partaking in a road rage incident. Finally, two questions
determined, first, if causes were explicitly offered by the participant for the event or for their own actions,
and second, if any lessons were learned by the participant. Each item was coded as yes or no.


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