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A Communicative Approach to Road Rage: Accounts of Driving and Retaliation
Unformatted Document Text:  Road Rage 15 Results Initiating Events Research Question 1a concerned the events that people claim initiate road rage. Frequency data were used to answer this question. Vehicular Communication behaviors were the most commonly reported initiating behaviors. Fifty-eight percent of the events began with a competitive behavior (e.g., cutting off someone). Twenty percent of the events began with intimidating behaviors such as tailgating, honking the horn, or flashing lights. Other initiating behaviors included passive behaviors (15%) and behaviors with intention to harm (4%). In two instances, the initiating behavior did not involve the car. One case began with aggressive communication (1%) and another with a passive-aggressive act (1%). Only 11. 6% of the incidents consisted of two initiating behaviors. Of those reporting two behaviors in the first turn, aggressive communication (i.e., yelling or flipping off) was reported as the second behavior most frequently (38%). The driver of the other vehicle involved in the road rage incident (hereafter referred to as the other driver) initiated the incident 78% of the time. The respondent only reported initiating the incident 22% of the time. Seventy-eight percent of the other drivers, whose sex was reported, were male. Behavioral Reactions of Drivers Research Question 1b queried what behavioral reactions do participants report? In road rage sequences began by the other driver, the participant responded with intimidating behaviors (i.e., tailgating) 33% of the time and competitive behaviors 15% of the time. If the turn continued beyond this act (which only 29% did), then aggressive communication was the most frequent action (40%). Ten percent of the incidents continued to a third behavior. The most common reaction of the other driver was to either intimidate (21%) or to use aggressive communication (34%). A total tabulation of the reaction behaviors by both the respondents and the other driver can be found in Table 1. The most common reaction, whether to the initiating behavior, or a reaction to a reaction, was aggressive communication (27%). Twenty percent of the time intimidating behaviors were used by either driver. Furthermore, both avoidance and competitive behaviors were used 15% of the time. Other behaviors were used less than seven percent of the time.

Authors: Canary, Daniel., Mikkelson, Alan., Switzer, Frank. and Bailey, Carrie.
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Road Rage 15
Results
Initiating Events
Research Question 1a concerned the events that people claim initiate road rage. Frequency data
were used to answer this question. Vehicular Communication behaviors were the most commonly reported
initiating behaviors. Fifty-eight percent of the events began with a competitive behavior (e.g., cutting off
someone). Twenty percent of the events began with intimidating behaviors such as tailgating, honking the
horn, or flashing lights. Other initiating behaviors included passive behaviors (15%) and behaviors with
intention to harm (4%). In two instances, the initiating behavior did not involve the car. One case began with
aggressive communication (1%) and another with a passive-aggressive act (1%). Only 11. 6% of the
incidents consisted of two initiating behaviors. Of those reporting two behaviors in the first turn, aggressive
communication (i.e., yelling or flipping off) was reported as the second behavior most frequently (38%).
The driver of the other vehicle involved in the road rage incident (hereafter referred to as the other
driver) initiated the incident 78% of the time. The respondent only reported initiating the incident 22% of
the time. Seventy-eight percent of the other drivers, whose sex was reported, were male.
Behavioral Reactions of Drivers
Research Question 1b queried what behavioral reactions do participants report? In road rage
sequences began by the other driver, the participant responded with intimidating behaviors (i.e., tailgating)
33% of the time and competitive behaviors 15% of the time. If the turn continued beyond this act (which
only 29% did), then aggressive communication was the most frequent action (40%). Ten percent of the
incidents continued to a third behavior. The most common reaction of the other driver was to either
intimidate (21%) or to use aggressive communication (34%).
A total tabulation of the reaction behaviors by both the respondents and the other driver can be
found in Table 1. The most common reaction, whether to the initiating behavior, or a reaction to a reaction,
was aggressive communication (27%). Twenty percent of the time intimidating behaviors were used by
either driver. Furthermore, both avoidance and competitive behaviors were used 15% of the time. Other
behaviors were used less than seven percent of the time.


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