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A Communicative Approach to Road Rage: Accounts of Driving and Retaliation
Unformatted Document Text:  Road Rage 16 Emotional Reactions Research Question 1c asked about the emotional reactions of the participants. Emotions were coded twice, once after the initiating incident and before the conclusion of the road rage event, and then after the road rage incident was concluded. Fifty-five out of 69 participants reported emotions during the road rage incident. Some respondents reported multiple emotions, so emotions were coded as primary and secondary emotions. Of those reporting emotions, the most frequent primary and secondary emotion was anger (46%, 36%). Participants used extreme language to describe anger. “I was so pissed I could have rammed him off the road.” Another respondent wrote, “I was livid by this point cursing and screaming at them.” Some respondents reported being so mad that they would have resorted to physical violence if they could have. “Had I not been running late I may have followed them to their destination and verbally if not physically assaulted them.” Some instances did end in violence. “Right when I reached him, he decided to turn and flee. It was too late, I had already clocked his ass in the head.” The second most frequent primary emotion was horror (11%). Surprise and horror were both reported as secondary emotions 17% of the time, making them the second most frequent secondary emotions. Some reports of horror were fear of an accident. “I was scared that I would be rear ended or sideswiped.” Some even reported being scared that the other driver had a gun. “I was kind of scared that this guy was going to pull a gun out on us or something.” However, there was only one incident where a gun actually appeared. Both cars involved contained several men. The participant wrote, “This other car sped up to us and drove along side us. While traveling one guy in the backseat flashed a gun at us to scare us, it worked.” The emotions the respondents described after the incident were characterized as primary and secondary epilogue emotions. The most frequent primary emotion reported was anger (37% of those reporting epilogue emotions). The most frequent secondary emotion was horror (36%). The total frequencies for both primary and secondary emotions can be found in Table 2. Association between Initial Event and Reaction Research Question 1d asked, whether any association exists between initial, precipitating events and

Authors: Canary, Daniel., Mikkelson, Alan., Switzer, Frank. and Bailey, Carrie.
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Road Rage 16
Emotional Reactions
Research Question 1c asked about the emotional reactions of the participants. Emotions were coded
twice, once after the initiating incident and before the conclusion of the road rage event, and then after the
road rage incident was concluded. Fifty-five out of 69 participants reported emotions during the road rage
incident. Some respondents reported multiple emotions, so emotions were coded as primary and secondary
emotions. Of those reporting emotions, the most frequent primary and secondary emotion was anger (46%,
36%). Participants used extreme language to describe anger. “I was so pissed I could have rammed him off
the road.” Another respondent wrote, “I was livid by this point cursing and screaming at them.” Some
respondents reported being so mad that they would have resorted to physical violence if they could have.
“Had I not been running late I may have followed them to their destination and verbally if not physically
assaulted them.” Some instances did end in violence. “Right when I reached him, he decided to turn and
flee. It was too late, I had already clocked his ass in the head.”
The second most frequent primary emotion was horror (11%). Surprise and horror were both
reported as secondary emotions 17% of the time, making them the second most frequent secondary
emotions. Some reports of horror were fear of an accident. “I was scared that I would be rear ended or
sideswiped.” Some even reported being scared that the other driver had a gun. “I was kind of scared that
this guy was going to pull a gun out on us or something.” However, there was only one incident where a
gun actually appeared. Both cars involved contained several men. The participant wrote, “This other car
sped up to us and drove along side us. While traveling one guy in the backseat flashed a gun at us to scare
us, it worked.”
The emotions the respondents described after the incident were characterized as primary and
secondary epilogue emotions. The most frequent primary emotion reported was anger (37% of those
reporting epilogue emotions). The most frequent secondary emotion was horror (36%). The total
frequencies for both primary and secondary emotions can be found in Table 2.
Association between Initial Event and Reaction
Research Question 1d asked, whether any association exists between initial, precipitating events and


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