All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Communicative Approach to Road Rage: Accounts of Driving and Retaliation
Unformatted Document Text:  Road Rage 6 convertibles (i.e., their condition was anonymous) honked more frequently, and for longer durations than did subjects driving convertibles with the tops down. They concluded that anonymity facilitates aggression. In a complementary fashion, Harding et al. (1998) argued a critical feature of road rage is that the target of aggression is anonymous (p. 224). Higher levels of overall stress and individual stress-causing events are also seen as causes of aggressive driving and road rage (e.g., Lupton, 1999). Matthews et al. (1999) claimed that “convincing evidence” exists that high levels of “life stress” due to increased pace and demands have contributed heavily to aggressive driving. Contributing to an individual's stress is the extent to which one is in a rush to get somewhere. Drivers who are in a hurry are road rage time bombs simply looking for a place to detonate. The NHTSA (2002) found that “drivers being rushed or behind schedule” was one of the primary reasons for aggressive driving. Ferguson (1998) also found that lateness is a precondition for aggressive driving: “When police departments in the Washington [D.C.] area launched a program to crack down on aggressive driving last year [1997], cops handed out some 60,000 tickets in 28 days for offenses ranging from tailgating to passing on the right. The most common excuse: ‘I’m late.’” (p. 3). Finally, Shinar (1998) conducted five studies that support his argument that aggressive driving and road rage are more a result of the environment and circumstances than of frustrated, impatient, and angry people on the edge. I propose that over the past few decades, drivers have not changed their personality and have not become more aggressive people. Instead, the conditions that elicit aggressive behaviors–especially on the road–have changed, so that the level of frustration is above the ‘aggression threshold’ for more and more drivers. (p. 141) Shinar (1998) indicated that more drivers currently occupy an increasingly shrinking ratio of available roads, and that the available roads are consequentially more congested than ever before. He stresses that aggressive behavior is more serious in high congestion than in less crowded circumstances. In a similar vein, Lownestein (1997) argued that the time of day (afternoons as opposed to mornings), higher outside temperatures, and a condition termed “low frustration tolerance” are all associated with higher levels of

Authors: Canary, Daniel., Mikkelson, Alan., Switzer, Frank. and Bailey, Carrie.
first   previous   Page 6 of 29   next   last



background image
Road Rage 6
convertibles (i.e., their condition was anonymous) honked more frequently, and for longer durations than did
subjects driving convertibles with the tops down. They concluded that anonymity facilitates aggression. In
a complementary fashion, Harding et al. (1998) argued a critical feature of road rage is that the target of
aggression is anonymous (p. 224).
Higher levels of overall stress and individual stress-causing events are also seen as causes of
aggressive driving and road rage (e.g., Lupton, 1999). Matthews et al. (1999) claimed that “convincing
evidence” exists that high levels of “life stress” due to increased pace and demands have contributed heavily
to aggressive driving. Contributing to an individual's stress is the extent to which one is in a rush to get
somewhere. Drivers who are in a hurry are road rage time bombs simply looking for a place to detonate.
The NHTSA (2002) found that “drivers being rushed or behind schedule” was one of the primary reasons
for aggressive driving. Ferguson (1998) also found that lateness is a precondition for aggressive driving:
“When police departments in the Washington [D.C.] area launched a program to crack down on aggressive
driving last year [1997], cops handed out some 60,000 tickets in 28 days for offenses ranging from tailgating
to passing on the right. The most common excuse: ‘I’m late.’” (p. 3).
Finally, Shinar (1998) conducted five studies that support his argument that aggressive driving and
road rage are more a result of the environment and circumstances than of frustrated, impatient, and angry
people on the edge.
I propose that over the past few decades, drivers have not changed their personality and have not
become more aggressive people. Instead, the conditions that elicit aggressive behaviors–especially
on the road–have changed, so that the level of frustration is above the ‘aggression threshold’ for
more and more drivers. (p. 141)
Shinar (1998) indicated that more drivers currently occupy an increasingly shrinking ratio of available roads,
and that the available roads are consequentially more congested than ever before. He stresses that
aggressive behavior is more serious in high congestion than in less crowded circumstances. In a similar
vein, Lownestein (1997) argued that the time of day (afternoons as opposed to mornings), higher outside
temperatures, and a condition termed “low frustration tolerance” are all associated with higher levels of


Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 6 of 29   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.