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Framing a Friendly Dictator: U.S. Newsmagazine Coverage of Pakistani President Musharraf After 9/11
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing a Friendly Dictator: U.S. Newsmagazine Coverage of Pakistani President Musharraf After 9/11 20 Housewives and grandmothers who used to spend their mornings gossiping and getting manicures are diligently attending Koran groups”; “Islam and the modern world cannot coexist,” Time, Oct. 1, One Family Divided). Pakistan was depicted as a “culture of Islamic radicalism” and a “crucible of politics and religion” where “honor and revenge” are the paramount code. When opposed to the “mob,” Musharraf was described as a calming factor, a force of order capable of opposing the “Islamic threat” (“the fight that matters will be struggle of a seemingly professional soldier, Pakistani’s military ruler, Pervez Musharraf, against the agitations and the wrath of the mob”; “he could join the forces of stability or let Pakistan drift into further chaos,” U.S. News and World Report, Oct. 1, In the cruel mountains; “ Musharraf held back the tide and stood up to the fundamentalists and the agitators,” U.S. News and World Report, Nov. 26, The Gathering Fog Over Araby; “he is targeted by Islamic radicals; so he will use the brutality and cunning that got him where he is to stay,” U.S. News & World Report, Oct. 12, On the Mean Streets). One exemplar in particular emphasized Musharraf’s opposition to “Islamic fundamentalists”: the media repeatedly reported that the Pakistani leader’s role model is Kemal Ataturk, the founder of Turkey as a secular society (“the founder of Turkey’s military-guided secular society,” Newsweek, Jan. 28, Pakistan’s Striving Son). Musharraf as a guarantee for peace All of the three magazines argued that, because the country is in a chaotic state, Musharraf is one of the few guarantees for peace in the region. If Musharraf would lose power, the takeover by the “Islamic fundamentalists” would be inevitable (“his government might be precarious, susceptible to a revolt by Islamic extremists;” “hard-

Authors: Obad, Orlanda.
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background image
Framing a Friendly Dictator: U.S. Newsmagazine Coverage of Pakistani
President Musharraf After 9/11
20
Housewives and grandmothers who used to spend their mornings gossiping and getting
manicures are diligently attending Koran groups”; “Islam and the modern world cannot
coexist,” Time, Oct. 1, One Family Divided). Pakistan was depicted as a “culture of
Islamic radicalism” and a “crucible of politics and religion” where “honor and revenge”
are the paramount code.
When opposed to the “mob,” Musharraf was described as a calming factor, a
force of order capable of opposing the “Islamic threat” (“the fight that matters will be
struggle of a seemingly professional soldier, Pakistani’s military ruler, Pervez Musharraf,
against the agitations and the wrath of the mob”; “he could join the forces of stability or
let Pakistan drift into further chaos,” U.S. News and World Report, Oct. 1, In the cruel
mountains; “ Musharraf held back the tide and stood up to the fundamentalists and the
agitators,” U.S. News and World Report, Nov. 26, The Gathering Fog Over Araby; “he is
targeted by Islamic radicals; so he will use the brutality and cunning that got him where
he is to stay,” U.S. News & World Report, Oct. 12, On the Mean Streets).
One exemplar in particular emphasized Musharraf’s opposition to “Islamic
fundamentalists”: the media repeatedly reported that the Pakistani leader’s role model is
Kemal Ataturk, the founder of Turkey as a secular society (“the founder of Turkey’s
military-guided secular society,” Newsweek, Jan. 28, Pakistan’s Striving Son).
Musharraf as a guarantee for peace
All of the three magazines argued that, because the country is in a chaotic state,
Musharraf is one of the few guarantees for peace in the region. If Musharraf would lose
power, the takeover by the “Islamic fundamentalists” would be inevitable (“his
government might be precarious, susceptible to a revolt by Islamic extremists;” “hard-


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