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Framing a Friendly Dictator: U.S. Newsmagazine Coverage of Pakistani President Musharraf After 9/11
Unformatted Document Text:  Framing a Friendly Dictator: U.S. Newsmagazine Coverage of Pakistani President Musharraf After 9/11 6 widen the gap between Western and Islamic countries. On the superficial layer, some of the most reoccurring biases in the U.S. media coverage of Islam are produced because of the lack of journalists’ knowledge and education. Said (1997) claims that the Western, and particularly American media, tend to cover Islam in an orthodox, canonical way, which mirrors long-standing cultural prejudices of the West towards Islam that the author previously explained in Orientalism, one of the seminal works in this field. Drawing upon Said’s work, Karim (2001) emphasizes the dominant narratives that depict Muslims in the Western media. Karim (2001) argues that one of the greatest problems of Western media coverage of Islam is that Muslims as a whole are presented as dangerous to Western interests. Throughout a long period of misusage, the “Islamicness” of certain actions became a self-explanatory denominator that denotes a militant religion opposed to modernity of any kind. Terms like “Islamic fundamentalists” or “Islamic militants,” that have become a part of the large frame of the Western media coverage of Islam, therefore, irretrievably attribute negative meanings to one whole religion. Said (1997) claims that labels attributed to the Muslim population today could not be attributed to any other ethnic or religious group in the mainstream discussion. Literature review Critical perspective of the U.S. media coverage of the international news In an extensive body of literature that has been written about the determinants of international news coverage in U.S. media, a reoccurring theme that can be determined: the attributes of a country that the event took place in often determine the coverage almost as much as than the event itself.

Authors: Obad, Orlanda.
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Framing a Friendly Dictator: U.S. Newsmagazine Coverage of Pakistani
President Musharraf After 9/11
6
widen the gap between Western and Islamic countries. On the superficial layer, some of
the most reoccurring biases in the U.S. media coverage of Islam are produced because of
the lack of journalists’ knowledge and education. Said (1997) claims that the Western,
and particularly American media, tend to cover Islam in an orthodox, canonical way,
which mirrors long-standing cultural prejudices of the West towards Islam that the author
previously explained in Orientalism, one of the seminal works in this field.
Drawing upon Said’s work, Karim (2001) emphasizes the dominant narratives
that depict Muslims in the Western media. Karim (2001) argues that one of the greatest
problems of Western media coverage of Islam is that Muslims as a whole are presented
as dangerous to Western interests. Throughout a long period of misusage, the
“Islamicness” of certain actions became a self-explanatory denominator that denotes a
militant religion opposed to modernity of any kind. Terms like “Islamic fundamentalists”
or “Islamic militants,” that have become a part of the large frame of the Western media
coverage of Islam, therefore, irretrievably attribute negative meanings to one whole
religion. Said (1997) claims that labels attributed to the Muslim population today could
not be attributed to any other ethnic or religious group in the mainstream discussion.
Literature review
Critical perspective of the U.S. media coverage of the international news
In an extensive body of literature that has been written about the determinants of
international news coverage in U.S. media, a reoccurring theme that can be determined:
the attributes of a country that the event took place in often determine the coverage
almost as much as than the event itself.


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