All Academic, Inc. Research Logo

Info/CitationFAQResearchAll Academic Inc.
Document

A Social Cognitive Explanation of Internet Uses and Gratifications: Toward a New Theory of Media Attendance
Unformatted Document Text:  A Social Cognitive Explanation of Internet Uses and Gratifications: Toward a New Theory of Media Attendance The addition of the Internet to the electronic media environment has renewed interest in the question of media attendance: the factors that explain and predict individual exposure to the media. Much of the research has followed the conventions of the uses and gratifications framework, but there have been fresh approaches to conceptualizing the problem of media attendance that have introduced new conceptual and operational approaches and new variables. However, these relationships have been explored among college student samples and must now be extended to the general online population. The present research tests a model of media attendance inspired by Bandura’s (1986) Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) that builds upon the conventional uses and gratifications approach. Uses and Gratifications Meet the Internet . Numerous studies (e.g. Kaye, 1998; Eighmey & McCord, 1998; Perse & Greenberg- Dunn, 1998; Korgaonkar & Wolin, 1999; Lin, 1999; Parker & Plank, 2000; Ferguson & Perse, 2000; Papacharissi & Rubin, 2000; Dimmick et al., 2000; Chou & Hsiao, 2000, Flanagin & Metzger, 2001; Charney & Greenberg, 2001; LaRose, Mastro & Eastin, 2001; Stafford, 2001; Song, LaRose, Lin & Eastin, 2002;) have applied Uses and gratifications to the Internet, extending a well-known theory of media attendance that is arguably the dominant paradigm of media attendance (Palmgreen, Wenner & Rosengren, 1985). Collectively, these studies have generally upheld the basic proposition about media attendance from the Uses and gratifications tradition: the gratifications sought from the Internet predict individual exposure to the medium.

Authors: Eastin, Matthew. and Larose, Robert.
first   previous   Page 3 of 36   next   last



background image
A Social Cognitive Explanation of Internet Uses and Gratifications: Toward a New
Theory of Media Attendance
The addition of the Internet to the electronic media environment has renewed
interest in the question of media attendance: the factors that explain and predict
individual exposure to the media. Much of the research has followed the conventions of
the uses and gratifications framework, but there have been fresh approaches to
conceptualizing the problem of media attendance that have introduced new conceptual
and operational approaches and new variables. However, these relationships have been
explored among college student samples and must now be extended to the general online
population. The present research tests a model of media attendance inspired by Bandura’s
(1986) Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) that builds upon the conventional uses and
gratifications approach.

Uses and Gratifications Meet the Internet
. Numerous studies (e.g. Kaye, 1998; Eighmey & McCord, 1998; Perse &
Greenberg- Dunn, 1998; Korgaonkar & Wolin, 1999; Lin, 1999; Parker & Plank, 2000;
Ferguson & Perse, 2000; Papacharissi & Rubin, 2000; Dimmick et al., 2000; Chou &
Hsiao, 2000, Flanagin & Metzger, 2001; Charney & Greenberg, 2001; LaRose, Mastro
& Eastin, 2001; Stafford, 2001; Song, LaRose, Lin & Eastin, 2002;) have applied Uses
and gratifications to the Internet, extending a well-known theory of media attendance that
is arguably the dominant paradigm of media attendance (Palmgreen, Wenner &
Rosengren, 1985). Collectively, these studies have generally upheld the basic proposition
about media attendance from the Uses and gratifications tradition: the gratifications
sought from the Internet predict individual exposure to the medium.


Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.
Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!
Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!
Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

first   previous   Page 3 of 36   next   last

©2012 All Academic, Inc.