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Relationship between Developmental Stages and Video Game Uses and Gratifications, Game Preference and Amount of Time spent in Play
Unformatted Document Text:  Video game U&G 10 The survey contained three main scales which measured: 1) respondents liking of various video game genres, 2) amount of hours played in various dayparts during the typical week, and 3) uses and gratifications of video game play. In order to measure favorite game genres, respondents were asked to rate how much they like a series of video game genres on a scale from 0 to 6, with 0 indicating that they were not familiar with the genre, 1 indicating that they dislike the genre strongly, and 6 indicating that they like the genre strongly. These genres were developed by consulting video game playing magazines and websites, then they were pretested with a sample of undergraduate students (n = 120) for clarity and to ascertain whether the categories were mutually exclusive. The genres included: Strategy, Puzzle, Fantasy-Role Playing, Action-Adventure, Sports, Sims, Racing-Speed, Shooters, Fighters, Arcade, Card-Dice, Quiz-Trivia, and Classic Board Games (see Table 1). Next, game genres were clustered in patterns of game liking based on strength of correlation using principal axis factoring. The cluster analysis resulted in three game type clusters: Imagination games which included Fantasy- Role Playing, Action-Adventure, Strategy, and Sims; Traditional games which included Classic Board Games, Arcade, Card-Dice, Quiz-Trivia, Puzzle games; and Physical Enactment games which included Shooters, Fighters, Sports, and Racing-Speed games. Uses and gratifications of video games were based on a 22-item scale developed in a study by Sherry, Lucas, Rechtsteiner, Brooks and Wilson (2001) using a similar methodology to the one used to develop Greenberg’s (1974) original uses and gratification scale. They ran interviews and focus groups to identify the main reasons people use the games, developed a set of Likert scaled items, and pretested the items numerous times until a valid, reliable and parsimonious scale emerged. The scale consists of six video game uses and gratifications: Competition ( α = .86) to be the best player of the game; Challenge ( α = .80) to push yourself to

Authors: Sherry, John., Desouza, Rebecca., Greenberg, Bradley. and Lachlan, Ken.
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Video game U&G
10
The survey contained three main scales which measured: 1) respondents liking of various
video game genres, 2) amount of hours played in various dayparts during the typical week, and
3) uses and gratifications of video game play. In order to measure favorite game genres,
respondents were asked to rate how much they like a series of video game genres on a scale from
0 to 6, with 0 indicating that they were not familiar with the genre, 1 indicating that they dislike
the genre strongly, and 6 indicating that they like the genre strongly. These genres were
developed by consulting video game playing magazines and websites, then they were pretested
with a sample of undergraduate students (n = 120) for clarity and to ascertain whether the
categories were mutually exclusive. The genres included: Strategy, Puzzle, Fantasy-Role
Playing, Action-Adventure, Sports, Sims, Racing-Speed, Shooters, Fighters, Arcade, Card-Dice,
Quiz-Trivia, and Classic Board Games (see Table 1). Next, game genres were clustered in
patterns of game liking based on strength of correlation using principal axis factoring. The
cluster analysis resulted in three game type clusters: Imagination games which included Fantasy-
Role Playing, Action-Adventure, Strategy, and Sims; Traditional games which included Classic
Board Games, Arcade, Card-Dice, Quiz-Trivia, Puzzle games; and Physical Enactment games
which included Shooters, Fighters, Sports, and Racing-Speed games.
Uses and gratifications of video games were based on a 22-item scale developed in a
study by Sherry, Lucas, Rechtsteiner, Brooks and Wilson (2001) using a similar methodology to
the one used to develop Greenberg’s (1974) original uses and gratification scale. They ran
interviews and focus groups to identify the main reasons people use the games, developed a set
of Likert scaled items, and pretested the items numerous times until a valid, reliable and
parsimonious scale emerged. The scale consists of six video game uses and gratifications:
Competition (
α
= .86) to be the best player of the game; Challenge (
α
= .80) to push yourself to


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