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Relationship between Developmental Stages and Video Game Uses and Gratifications, Game Preference and Amount of Time spent in Play
Unformatted Document Text:  Video game U&G 5 viewed. According to the study, a child who had begun using television by age three typically used it for about 45 minutes a day, by age five viewing time had increased to a little over two hours a day, and from age six to about the time the child entered adolescence viewing time had increased to approximately two and a half hours per day. Between the fifth and the eighth grades there was a sharp increase in viewing time with adolescents spending a little more than three hours a day using television by the eighth grade. After the eighth grade, viewing time tapered until by the twelfth grade adolescents were watching approximately two and a half hours of television. With regard to content, Schramm, et al. (1961) found children’s programs (programs with animated characters) to be the most popular among preschoolers. During the first six school years children’s variety shows, adventure, science fiction and westerns gained popularity, but toward the end of this period, interest in situation comedies, crime mystery and popular music increased. By the twelfth grade, adolescents were watching adult westerns, situation comedies, crime dramas, popular music and current affairs. Rosengren and Windahl (1989) conducted a similar study on 1800 Swedish children (preschoolers to tenth graders) as part of the Media Panel Program. Young children, adolescents and parents were questioned about media habits and a number of related phenomena. The study found significant differences between age groups in amount of time spent using television. Results showed that fifth graders watched an average of 14 hours a week, while ninth graders watched only about 10 hours a week. A recent national survey conducted on a representative sample of 2902 American children as part of the University of Michigan’s Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics examined differences in electronic media use by age and sex (Wright, Huston, Vadewater, Bickham, Scantlin, Kotler, Caplovitz, Lee, Hofferth, &

Authors: Sherry, John., Desouza, Rebecca., Greenberg, Bradley. and Lachlan, Ken.
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Video game U&G
5
viewed. According to the study, a child who had begun using television by age three typically
used it for about 45 minutes a day, by age five viewing time had increased to a little over two
hours a day, and from age six to about the time the child entered adolescence viewing time had
increased to approximately two and a half hours per day. Between the fifth and the eighth grades
there was a sharp increase in viewing time with adolescents spending a little more than three
hours a day using television by the eighth grade. After the eighth grade, viewing time tapered
until by the twelfth grade adolescents were watching approximately two and a half hours of
television. With regard to content, Schramm, et al. (1961) found children’s programs (programs
with animated characters) to be the most popular among preschoolers. During the first six school
years children’s variety shows, adventure, science fiction and westerns gained popularity, but
toward the end of this period, interest in situation comedies, crime mystery and popular music
increased. By the twelfth grade, adolescents were watching adult westerns, situation comedies,
crime dramas, popular music and current affairs.
Rosengren and Windahl (1989) conducted a similar study on 1800 Swedish children
(preschoolers to tenth graders) as part of the Media Panel Program. Young children, adolescents
and parents were questioned about media habits and a number of related phenomena. The study
found significant differences between age groups in amount of time spent using television.
Results showed that fifth graders watched an average of 14 hours a week, while ninth graders
watched only about 10 hours a week.
A recent national survey conducted on a representative sample of 2902 American
children as part of the University of Michigan’s Child Development Supplement to the Panel
Study of Income Dynamics examined differences in electronic media use by age and sex
(Wright, Huston, Vadewater, Bickham, Scantlin, Kotler, Caplovitz, Lee, Hofferth, &


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