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Relationship between Developmental Stages and Video Game Uses and Gratifications, Game Preference and Amount of Time spent in Play
Unformatted Document Text:  Video game U&G 6 Finkelstein, 2001). Children of four age groups (0 –2 years, 3- 5 years, 6- 8years, and 9- 12 years) filled out two 24-hour media time-use diaries; one from a weekday and one from a weekend day. Parents and children gave reports of time spent using television and genres used. Results showed that the youngest children (0 –2) watched significantly less television than the three older groups and had a mean of 644.56 minutes of television viewing per week. However, no significant differences were found between the other age groups in the amount of time spent using television. With regard to video game play in the sample (N=2902), 25% reported playing games at least once while 75% reported no game use. Boys spent significantly more minutes per week playing video games than did girls, however there were no significant age effects on total minutes of game play. Video Games and Stages of Adolescence Ambron (1975) refers to adolescence as the bridge between childhood and adulthood during which the individual undergoes gross physical, cognitive and social changes. These changes are typically observed at three specific transition points: 1) preadolescence which is the period just before adolescence (ages 9 to 12); 2) adolescence (ages 12-17); and 3) young adulthood or the period between adolescence and adulthood (ages 18-21) (Manaster, 1977). While the age categories are not rigid, they do correspond to certain stages of physical, cognitive and social development (Rosengren & Windahl, 1989). For the purpose of our study we shall examine the cognitive and social dimensions of development at each of these stages. Cognitive development. Piaget’s (1980) stage dependent theory of cognitive development offers three key phases within this period of development: 1) Concrete operations stage (ages 6 to 12), formal operations substage IIIA (ages 12-15), and formal operations substage IIIB (ages 15 +). During the concrete operations stage, the child develops the ability to form concepts of

Authors: Sherry, John., Desouza, Rebecca., Greenberg, Bradley. and Lachlan, Ken.
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Video game U&G
6
Finkelstein, 2001). Children of four age groups (0 –2 years, 3- 5 years, 6- 8years, and 9- 12
years) filled out two 24-hour media time-use diaries; one from a weekday and one from a
weekend day. Parents and children gave reports of time spent using television and genres used.
Results showed that the youngest children (0 –2) watched significantly less television than the
three older groups and had a mean of 644.56 minutes of television viewing per week. However,
no significant differences were found between the other age groups in the amount of time spent
using television. With regard to video game play in the sample (N=2902), 25% reported playing
games at least once while 75% reported no game use. Boys spent significantly more minutes per
week playing video games than did girls, however there were no significant age effects on total
minutes of game play.
Video Games and Stages of Adolescence
Ambron (1975) refers to adolescence as the bridge between childhood and adulthood
during which the individual undergoes gross physical, cognitive and social changes. These
changes are typically observed at three specific transition points: 1) preadolescence which is the
period just before adolescence (ages 9 to 12); 2) adolescence (ages 12-17); and 3) young
adulthood or the period between adolescence and adulthood (ages 18-21) (Manaster, 1977).
While the age categories are not rigid, they do correspond to certain stages of physical, cognitive
and social development (Rosengren & Windahl, 1989). For the purpose of our study we shall
examine the cognitive and social dimensions of development at each of these stages.
Cognitive development. Piaget’s (1980) stage dependent theory of cognitive development
offers three key phases within this period of development: 1) Concrete operations stage (ages 6
to 12), formal operations substage IIIA (ages 12-15), and formal operations substage IIIB (ages
15 +). During the concrete operations stage, the child develops the ability to form concepts of


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