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Researcher and Therapist: The Conversations of the Qualitative Interview
Unformatted Document Text:  12 Conversation I: Is that true for you, too? P: I was extremely lonely when I first came out. I felt like I had nobody. I felt like I was really going out on a limb trusting people, giving all my trust to people. I was meeting people off the computer because I had no idea where to go. This sequence of dialog demonstrates how the interviewer’s initial understanding (“like slut, tramp . . . things like that”) encourages an expanded response from the participant. A second empathetic response by the interviewer (“so it sounds like there’s a lot of loneliness”) captures an unspoken element (loneliness) that the participant aligns with (“Loneliness, that’s a big thing.”) This allows the therapist to probe (“Is that true for you, too?”) for further information. This sequence of dialog also illustrates how the interviewer and participant jointly construct an image of LGB identity that now includes the element of loneliness. In an act of co-creation, the dialog creates stepping-stones of meaning that allow each person to build upon the previous utterance. In this way, the discourse ultimately creates a jointly formed image of LGB identity that assumes the element of loneliness. Reflective listening. Reflective listening is utilized within therapy as a means of gaining greater detail or clarification of a client’s statement (Farber & Lane, 2002). The strategy of reflective listening offers concern for the client’s feelings and promotes insight into individual meaning-making processes. As clients hear their feelings and thoughts expressed by a therapist, they gain increased understanding and experience alternative interpretations of their experiences. This next exemplar presents an example of reflective listening as utilized within the context of the interviews and identifies how this strategy may be utilized to privilege positive rather than negative reports of experience.

Authors: Kelly, Nancy.
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background image
12
Conversation
I:
Is that true for you, too?
P:
I was extremely lonely when I first came out. I felt like I had nobody. I felt like I
was really going out on a limb trusting people, giving all my trust to people. I was
meeting people off the computer because I had no idea where to go.
This sequence of dialog demonstrates how the interviewer’s initial understanding (“like
slut, tramp . . . things like that”) encourages an expanded response from the participant. A second
empathetic response by the interviewer (“so it sounds like there’s a lot of loneliness”) captures an
unspoken element (loneliness) that the participant aligns with (“Loneliness, that’s a big thing.”)
This allows the therapist to probe (“Is that true for you, too?”) for further information. This
sequence of dialog also illustrates how the interviewer and participant jointly construct an image
of LGB identity that now includes the element of loneliness. In an act of co-creation, the dialog
creates stepping-stones of meaning that allow each person to build upon the previous utterance.
In this way, the discourse ultimately creates a jointly formed image of LGB identity that assumes
the element of loneliness.
Reflective listening. Reflective listening is utilized within therapy as a means of gaining
greater detail or clarification of a client’s statement (Farber & Lane, 2002). The strategy of
reflective listening offers concern for the client’s feelings and promotes insight into individual
meaning-making processes. As clients hear their feelings and thoughts expressed by a therapist,
they gain increased understanding and experience alternative interpretations of their experiences.
This next exemplar presents an example of reflective listening as utilized within the context of
the interviews and identifies how this strategy may be utilized to privilege positive rather than
negative reports of experience.


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