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Researcher and Therapist: The Conversations of the Qualitative Interview
Unformatted Document Text:  16 Conversation I: I spoke with someone the day I came to West Virginia, this morning actually. She works with the [name of organization] and she started a women’s group. P: It would be interesting to see how she started that. I: She did it through the auspices of work, put posters up there. Kind of put them in the right areas. P: That is an idea. See, I wouldn’t know where to hold meetings, or . . . I: Who knows, maybe you could use this house! P: We’re going to use your house tonight! There are going to be about 50 people here! I: For me, at least, community is really important. What do you think about community? [. . .] We see other people who are professors, who are police officers, who are married and have kids and now are different, or teachers or whatever. We see that and we get these role models and kids learn that it is ok, and adults learn that it is ok. It takes us a little longer, it seems. I really think it is important that people do that, and build community like that. P: I think it is extremely important and it is definitely something that is lacking here. The self-disclosure in this sequence of dialog accomplishes the same personal positioning seen earlier in the text (“I like that.”). It provides the participant with a sense of who the interviewer is (one who values community) and what he considers important (the way people build community). However, because this positioning is lengthier and more detailed, it evokes a very different response. Rather than respond with a personalized statement that is rich in detail, the participant merely repeats the interviewer’s original statement (“For me, at least, community

Authors: Kelly, Nancy.
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16
Conversation
I:
I spoke with someone the day I came to West Virginia, this morning actually. She
works with the [name of organization] and she started a women’s group.
P:
It would be interesting to see how she started that.
I:
She did it through the auspices of work, put posters up there. Kind of put
them in the right areas.
P:
That is an idea. See, I wouldn’t know where to hold meetings, or . . .
I:
Who knows, maybe you could use this house!
P:
We’re going to use your house tonight! There are going to be about 50
people here!
I:
For me, at least, community is really important. What do you think about
community? [. . .] We see other people who are professors, who are police
officers, who are married and have kids and now are different, or teachers or
whatever. We see that and we get these role models and kids learn that it is ok,
and adults learn that it is ok. It takes us a little longer, it seems. I really think it is
important that people do that, and build community like that.
P:
I think it is extremely important and it is definitely something that is
lacking here.
The self-disclosure in this sequence of dialog accomplishes the same personal positioning
seen earlier in the text (“I like that.”). It provides the participant with a sense of who the
interviewer is (one who values community) and what he considers important (the way people
build community). However, because this positioning is lengthier and more detailed, it evokes a
very different response. Rather than respond with a personalized statement that is rich in detail,
the participant merely repeats the interviewer’s original statement (“For me, at least, community


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