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Researcher and Therapist: The Conversations of the Qualitative Interview
Unformatted Document Text:  22 Conversation The participant expresses concern over the withdrawal of the interviewer (“Am I talking too much?”), initiating a repair (Hutchby & Wooffitt, 1999) of the dialog by the interviewer, (“You are talking just right.”) and an invitation to return to the conversation (“This is what this research project is supposed to be about, so if you want to ask me what I think, or ask a question, just ask. That is ok. I should have said that to begin with. So, is there anything you wanted to ask?”). However, the particpant declines the offer (“Not right now.”) and the interviewer must transition to a new topic (“So, jumping around now. I heard you talk about community, looking for some place to go other than bars, coffee shops, this and that. I am wondering what is the importance of community and how does it fit into your world?”). In general, the interviewer self-disclosures offered in this analysis tended to diminish the dialog of the participants or disrupt the flow of the interview process. They did not extend the relationship between the interviewer and participant and they often prompted the necessity of a repair in the conversation. The exemplars offered for analysis are representative of other self- disclosures found within the dialog. The therapeutic techniques employed as discursive strategies within these interviews contributed to the construction of identity in both implicit and explicit ways. The offering of empathy or reflective listening strategies encouraged more subtle constructions— ones that allowed the participants to recognize and assume a particular identity that fit with his or her own interpretations of experience. As the interviewer captured a participant’s experience with empathic statements or summarized feelings with reflective listening strategies, the participants demonstrated more engagement with the interview process and the interviewer. Conversely, within these interviews, the acts of self-disclosure implemented by the interviewer frequently inhibited or limited the spontaneity of the dialog and the reporting of identities in an explicit

Authors: Kelly, Nancy.
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22
Conversation
The participant expresses concern over the withdrawal of the interviewer (“Am I talking
too much?”), initiating a repair (Hutchby & Wooffitt, 1999) of the dialog by the interviewer,
(“You are talking just right.”) and an invitation to return to the conversation (“This is what this
research project is supposed to be about, so if you want to ask me what I think, or ask a question,
just ask. That is ok. I should have said that to begin with. So, is there anything you wanted to
ask?”). However, the particpant declines the offer (“Not right now.”) and the interviewer must
transition to a new topic (“So, jumping around now. I heard you talk about community, looking
for some place to go other than bars, coffee shops, this and that. I am wondering what is the
importance of community and how does it fit into your world?”).
In general, the interviewer self-disclosures offered in this analysis tended to diminish the
dialog of the participants or disrupt the flow of the interview process. They did not extend the
relationship between the interviewer and participant and they often prompted the necessity of a
repair in the conversation. The exemplars offered for analysis are representative of other self-
disclosures found within the dialog.
The therapeutic techniques employed as discursive strategies within these interviews
contributed to the construction of identity in both implicit and explicit ways. The offering of
empathy or reflective listening strategies encouraged more subtle constructions— ones that
allowed the participants to recognize and assume a particular identity that fit with his or her own
interpretations of experience. As the interviewer captured a participant’s experience with
empathic statements or summarized feelings with reflective listening strategies, the participants
demonstrated more engagement with the interview process and the interviewer. Conversely,
within these interviews, the acts of self-disclosure implemented by the interviewer frequently
inhibited or limited the spontaneity of the dialog and the reporting of identities in an explicit


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