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Researcher and Therapist: The Conversations of the Qualitative Interview
Unformatted Document Text:  8 Conversation language that is seated in the broader meaning systems of the dominant culture (Lyddon, 1995). Other perspectives assert that identity may be situational and adaptive, emerging as a response to particular contextual and environmental demands (e.g., Lucius-Hoene & Deppermann, 2000), while marginalized or oppressed group have suggested that identity is created through the politics of culture and that standards of identity have been established by White, Western males who seek to diminish and ignore individual voices (e.g., Sampson, 1995). Members of oppressed groups offer a message that underscores their discursive position. If, in order to be heard, I must speak in ways that you have proposed, then I can be heard and seen only if I speak like you, not like me. Rather than being an equal contributor, I remain enclosed in a discursive game that ensures your continuing advantage. (Sampson, 1993, p. 1221) According to Sampson (1993), this framework of invisible identity is experienced by multiple groups [e.g., women, African Americans, and lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons] within the larger dominant culture. Individuals who identify a lesbian, gay, or bisexual identity are additionally burdened by the constraints and stigmatization of a heterosexist society that assumes that heterosexuality is the only “legitimate” or “normal” sexual identity (Flowers & Buston, 2001). The Analysis of Discourse A discourse analysis focuses on the function of language within a particular context (Potter & Wetherell, 1987). Discourse analysts move beyond the content of dialog to explore how language is used to achieve particular functions or purposes. This methodology attends to the interpretive repertoires and implicit strategies of interlocutors. It examines structures and the processes by which a particular discourse may be implemented (VanDijk, 1985). In this way, the

Authors: Kelly, Nancy.
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8
Conversation
language that is seated in the broader meaning systems of the dominant culture (Lyddon, 1995).
Other perspectives assert that identity may be situational and adaptive, emerging as a response to
particular contextual and environmental demands (e.g., Lucius-Hoene & Deppermann, 2000),
while marginalized or oppressed group have suggested that identity is created through the politics
of culture and that standards of identity have been established by White, Western males who seek
to diminish and ignore individual voices (e.g., Sampson, 1995). Members of oppressed groups
offer a message that underscores their discursive position.
If, in order to be heard, I must speak in ways that you have proposed, then I can be heard
and seen only if I speak like you, not like me. Rather than being an equal contributor, I
remain enclosed in a discursive game that ensures your continuing advantage. (Sampson,
1993, p. 1221)
According to Sampson (1993), this framework of invisible identity is experienced by
multiple groups [e.g., women, African Americans, and lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons]
within the larger dominant culture. Individuals who identify a lesbian, gay, or bisexual identity
are additionally burdened by the constraints and stigmatization of a heterosexist society that
assumes that heterosexuality is the only “legitimate” or “normal” sexual identity (Flowers &
Buston, 2001).
The Analysis of Discourse
A discourse analysis focuses on the function of language within a particular context
(Potter & Wetherell, 1987). Discourse analysts move beyond the content of dialog to explore
how language is used to achieve particular functions or purposes. This methodology attends to
the interpretive repertoires and implicit strategies of interlocutors. It examines structures and the
processes by which a particular discourse may be implemented (VanDijk, 1985). In this way, the


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