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A Passage to India: Images of India in U.K/U.S Feature Films from 1930-2000
Unformatted Document Text:  A Passage to India Page 21 of 29 Student Paper an Englishman even says to the Indian character: “I guessed you were Indian when you telephoned. I could always tell by your voice.” Class. Indian characters were much more likely to be depicted as poor (44.7%, N=88) as compared to non-Indian characters (9.2%, N=20) whereas non-Indian characters were considerably more likely to be portrayed as middle class and rich (57.3% and 33.5% respectively) than Indian characters (33.5% and 21.8%) respectively, χ 2 (1, N = 415 8 ) = 67.9, p < 0.001. Rich class people were those who wore expensive clothes in silk, jewellery, lived in palatial homes (like palaces and mansions) and could afford several luxuries like big feasts, servants etc. Middle class persons were those who could afford casual clothes are those that are in good shape (not tattered), live in houses or apartments and have a reasonable but not luxurious lifestyle. Poor people were defined as those who wore rags, tatters, worked as laborers, beggars, slaves and vendors, and lived in huts, temporary shelters or in the wild. Health. Indian characters were much more likely to be shown as unhealthy (11.5%, N=23) as compared to non-Indian characters (3.2%, N=7), χ 2 (1, N = 421) = 11.0, p < 0.001. Unhealthiness was defined as physical disability, mental disability, chronic diseases (such as leprosy and cancer) and temporary illnesses (such as fevers). Religion. Non-Indian characters were much more likely to be Christians (99%, N=195) than other religions whereas Indian characters were more likely to be cults, Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims (92%, N=149), χ 2 (1, N = 359 9 ) = 301.8, p < 0.001The religion of the character was inferred from the name of the character, attire (like a nun’s 8 Characters whose social class were coded as “can’t tell” were not included in the analysis 9 Characters whose religion was not clear were excluded from the analysis

Authors: Ramasubramanian, Srividya.
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background image
A Passage to India
Page 21 of 29
Student Paper
an Englishman even says to the Indian character: “I guessed you were Indian when you
telephoned. I could always tell by your voice.”
Class. Indian characters were much more likely to be depicted as poor (44.7%,
N=88) as compared to non-Indian characters (9.2%, N=20) whereas non-Indian
characters were considerably more likely to be portrayed as middle class and rich (57.3%
and 33.5% respectively) than Indian characters (33.5% and 21.8%) respectively,
χ
2
(1, N
= 415
8
) = 67.9, p
< 0.001. Rich class people were those who wore expensive clothes in
silk, jewellery, lived in palatial homes (like palaces and mansions) and could afford
several luxuries like big feasts, servants etc. Middle class persons were those who could
afford casual clothes are those that are in good shape (not tattered), live in houses or
apartments and have a reasonable but not luxurious lifestyle. Poor people were defined
as those who wore rags, tatters, worked as laborers, beggars, slaves and vendors, and
lived in huts, temporary shelters or in the wild.
Health. Indian characters were much more likely to be shown as unhealthy
(11.5%, N=23) as compared to non-Indian characters (3.2%, N=7),
χ
2
(1, N = 421) =
11.0, p
< 0.001. Unhealthiness was defined as physical disability, mental disability,
chronic diseases (such as leprosy and cancer) and temporary illnesses (such as fevers).
Religion. Non-Indian characters were much more likely to be Christians (99%,
N=195) than other religions whereas Indian characters were more likely to be cults,
Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims (92%, N=149),
χ
2
(1, N = 359
9
) = 301.8, p
< 0.001The
religion of the character was inferred from the name of the character, attire (like a nun’s
8
Characters whose social class were coded as “can’t tell” were not included in the analysis
9
Characters whose religion was not clear were excluded from the analysis


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