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A Passage to India: Images of India in U.K/U.S Feature Films from 1930-2000
Unformatted Document Text:  A Passage to India Page 7 of 29 Student Paper movies and independent films were included in the sampling frame. Movie analysis included an examination of the genre (action, mystery, drama etc), year of release, country of production, name of director, name of producer and period of time that the story was set in. Scene level analysis. A scene was defined as a division of the motion picture that presented continuous action in one place or unit of dialogue taking place in India or/and where Indians appear in the narrative. Scene level analysis looked at type of scenes (romance, comedy, action, etc), parts of India where the scene is located (e.g., rural/urban, jungle, bazaar, palace etc), naming of the place (unnamed, real or fictitious place), atmosphere of the scene locale (climate, pollution), religious practices (fire- swallowing, walking on fire, animal sacrifice), social practices (depiction of marriage, death rituals etc.), modes of transportation, poverty, disease, disasters, animal life and attire (e.g., turbans, dhoti, sari). The scene analysis was used to address the research question regarding the comparative portrayal of India and Western countries. West is defined as US, UK, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand. Character level analysis. In this study, a character was defined as a person who was a part of the narrative of the movie and said at least one line of dialogue. This definition excluded “extras” and bystanders in the movie but included any character central to the plot. Characters were observed for the entire movie before recording their characteristics. In the character analysis, both Indian and non-Indian characters were coded for in order to get a comparative picture. Characters were coded for demographics (gender, occupation, race, age), language, primary place of residence (palace, mansion,

Authors: Ramasubramanian, Srividya.
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A Passage to India
Page 7 of 29
Student Paper
movies and independent films were included in the sampling frame. Movie analysis
included an examination of the genre (action, mystery, drama etc), year of release,
country of production, name of director, name of producer and period of time that the
story was set in.
Scene level analysis. A scene was defined as a division of the motion picture that
presented continuous action in one place or unit of dialogue taking place in India or/and
where Indians appear in the narrative. Scene level analysis looked at type of scenes
(romance, comedy, action, etc), parts of India where the scene is located (e.g.,
rural/urban, jungle, bazaar, palace etc), naming of the place (unnamed, real or fictitious
place), atmosphere of the scene locale (climate, pollution), religious practices (fire-
swallowing, walking on fire, animal sacrifice), social practices (depiction of marriage,
death rituals etc.), modes of transportation, poverty, disease, disasters, animal life and
attire (e.g., turbans, dhoti, sari). The scene analysis was used to address the research
question regarding the comparative portrayal of India and Western countries. West is
defined as US, UK, Canada, Europe, Australia, New Zealand.
Character level analysis. In this study, a character was defined as a person who
was a part of the narrative of the movie and said at least one line of dialogue. This
definition excluded “extras” and bystanders in the movie but included any character
central to the plot. Characters were observed for the entire movie before recording their
characteristics. In the character analysis, both Indian and non-Indian characters were
coded for in order to get a comparative picture. Characters were coded for demographics
(gender, occupation, race, age), language, primary place of residence (palace, mansion,


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